Msa

The Safety Company

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Earl Scott attends a Master Resilience Training course and listens to Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr. at the newly opened Master Resilience Training Center in Fort Jackson, S.C., April 12, 2010. Casey has expressed that Victory University in Pennsylvania will also be a center of excellence for resilience training in the Army.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Earl Scott attends a Master Resilience Training course and listens to Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr. at the newly opened Master Resilience Training Center in Fort Jackson, S.C., April 12, 2010. Casey has expressed that Victory University in Pennsylvania will also be a center of excellence for resilience training in the Army.

percent increase considered necessary to maintain the current force in the next few years.

In the executive summary of his 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review, Gates wrote of the need to maintain land, air, and naval forces capable of fighting both limited and large-scale conflicts, while also being prepared to respond to other challenges from both state and non-state groups. In no small part, that capability will rely on the experience of the current corps of officers and NCOs.

"This includes maintaining the ability to prevail against two capable nation-state aggressors, but we must take seriously the need to plan for the broadest possible range of operations - from homeland defense to deterrence and preparedness missions - occurring in multiple and unpredictable combinations," he wrote, adding that includes ullen creating an environment in which experienced personnel are more es C likely to remain in uniform, while acknowledging that may not always } be possible.

a "Operations over the past eight years have stressed the ground o forces disproportionately, but the future operational landscape could phot also portend significant long-duration air and maritime campaigns for g- which the U.S. armed forces must be prepared. Our preserve-and-« enhance efforts will focus on transitioning to sustainable rotation rates that protect the force's long-term health. The department plans that in times of significant crisis, U.S. forces will be prepared to experience higher deployment rates and briefer dwell periods for up to several years at a time and/or to mobilize the reserve component."

Being "battle-hardened" by nearly a decade of combat has given the U.S. military an unprecedented level of experience throughout both the enlisted ranks and officer corps - experience that already is being passed on to incoming recruits. But it also has led to a new concern for those who have had multiple deployments - or may have them in the future.

"Yes, soldiers have learned an awful lot about working together in combat, but there also are long-term effects on soldiers and their families, which is one reason, even down to the squad level, there is a serious look at telling individual soldiers 'Hey, you do need to take a knee here,'" Grady concluded. "Being in combat is a life-changing experience and you do need to take the time to heal yourself.

"In the Army, squad level leaders are now being sent to the University of Pennsylvania to be trained in how to recognize issues that come up with repeated deployments. That is being done with both NCOs and officers, as well, at Fort Jackson, S.C. [the Army's largest initial entry, basic combat, and advanced individual training center]."

THE ARMY'S WAY AHEAD

By Scott R. Gourley

The small unmanned ground vehicle (SUGV) is carried by one or more warfighters and typically used to perform a variety of tasks including reconnaissance, surveillance, and application of effects, such as door breach, smoke generation, or concussion grenade. The SUGV accepts modular sensor and/or effector payloads to perform these tasks.

Following completion of a Defense Acquisition Board (DAB) review In late December 2009, the U.S. Army received acquisition decision approval to move into low rate initial production for one Brigade Combat Team set of the "Increment 1" modernization program.

The decision was based in large part on the results of testing that had been conducted by the U.S. Army's Army Evaluation Task Force (5th Brigade, 1st Armored Division or 5-1 AD AETF), based at Fort Bliss, Texas.

Those initial "Increment 1" assets had included: the small unmanned ground vehicle (SUGV), the Class 1 unmanned aerial system (UAS), both Tactical and Urban versions of Unattended Ground Sensors (T-UGS/U-UGS), the Non-Line Of Sight missile system (NLOS-LS) and vehicle-mounted Network Integration Kits (NIKs).

At the time of the DAB approval, service representatives noted that the decision "formally paved the way for production of one Brigade Combat Team set of equipment, which will be used in Initial Operational Test and Evaluation [IOT&E] in FY 2011."

The Army subsequently identified 3rd Brigade, 1st Armored Division (3-1 AD), as the initial E-IBCT that will take the "Increment 1" brigade equipment through that IOT&E prior to anticipated deployment of that brigade to Afghanistan with the new equipment in FY 12.

The small unmanned ground vehicle (SUGV) is carried by one or more warfighters and typically used to perform a variety of tasks including reconnaissance, surveillance, and application of effects, such as door breach, smoke generation, or concussion grenade. The SUGV accepts modular sensor and/or effector payloads to perform these tasks.

Describing the December 2009 DAB results, service representatives added, "Additionally, the Army plans continued testing of all 'Increment 1' assets over the next two years."

Against a background of both major changes

- cancellation of NLOS-LS with alternate fielding of M777A2 howitzers for precision fires as well as NIK integration on MRAP vehicles - and minor changes - continuing reliability and performance upgrades on many remaining systems

- the 5-1 AD AETF has continued that aggressive testing program at White Sands Missile Range throughout 2010.

The unit began a series of milestone tests that led to critical Force Development Test and Evaluation (FDTE) and Limited User Test (LUT) '10 in September of 2010, with the results of that testing paving the way for acquisition decisions on the next two brigades of modernized equipment.

While early rounds of the testing were already under way, Defense: Land Forces Edition visited with service representatives at White Sands to discuss "the way ahead" in the Army modernization process.

Lt. Col. Erik Webb is the product manager for E-IBCT "Increment 1" within the Program Executive Office - Integration.

"We are an 'integrating' project office," Webb explained. "We do not acquire hardware systems, but instead our small team interfaces with 'Increment 1' prime contractors like Boeing and SAIC. Together we take items that have been through system integration laboratories and engineering development processes and bring them out here [to White Sands Missile Range] in what is something of an 'RF-hostile environment.'

"We bring the systems together, do those full functional checkouts, and often we find some anomalies that then have to go back for an engineering solution in terms of a software or hardware change. We then bring those changes out and check them again, so it is an iterative process," he added.

The equipment is then massed in sufficient quantities to meet the Army's test and evaluation master plan requirements to support both developmental and operational test events.

"We get the equipment ready," Webb said. "We interface with the 5-1 AD AETF and sign that equipment over. We then oversee the conduct of training in preparation for testing by the operators. We assist the operators during their initial individual and collective training. We get all of that going, so that the unit is then ready for TRADOC's [U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command] Force Development Test and then the Army's Limited User Test."

With that experience and process involvement, Webb is perfectly positioned to provide a look at the recent evolution of U.S. Army modernization efforts.

The Class I unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) - which operates in open, rolling, complex, and urban terrains with a vertical take-off and landing capability - is a platoon-level asset that provides reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, and laser designation. The Class I UAV provides a hover and stare capability that is not currently available in the Army UAS inventory for urban and route surveillance.

The Class I unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) - which operates in open, rolling, complex, and urban terrains with a vertical take-off and landing capability - is a platoon-level asset that provides reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, and laser designation. The Class I UAV provides a hover and stare capability that is not currently available in the Army UAS inventory for urban and route surveillance.

- READY FOR DEPLOYMENT -

THE LEUPOLD MARK 4*

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