Deer Horn Knives

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These weapons, also called Crescent Swords or Mandarin Duck Knives, are always used in pairs.They are short-range martial tools especially designed to disarm the opponent and be effective against a variety of types of long and short traditional weapons. One of the fight scenes in the recent kung-fu epic Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon shows a fight scene between one of the villains and a bounty hunter who uses a pair of these weapons.

Deer Horn Knives come in a variety of sizes. The ones used in Erle's form are of the rarer Bei-jing variation with one of the forward prongs twice as long as the other. They can be used for thrusting as well as locking and cutting. At the basic level, you block or check the attackers's weapon with one of yours while counter-attacking with the other.

Using this weapon properly also requires that ideally you attack the opponent's hand which is holding the weapon, rather than just making contact blade on blade. Of course, this requires that your appreciation of timing and distance must be much better than your opponent's.

The knives are difficult for an opponent to wrestle from your grip, as there are four points and seven edges in seemingly every direction near the handle. This means also that they can cut the wielder as well as the opponent. In one motion, the back hook may block a weapon while the front hook strikes, followed by a ripping cut from one of the edges. As the knife is withdrawn, the other hooks on it may slash through the area of first contact.

I have had the chance over the years to see and handle two pairs of these weapons. One set was a reproduction of an antique pair, handmade by a metalworker who collected antique Chinese weapons. The other pair were supposed to be antiques from the turn of the century. Neither pair were identical in design to each other or to the ones we have and use in my classes. Both pairs seemed well-balanced and potentially lethal.

Neither of them had sharpened edges on the two short prongs that protect the wielder's hand, and neither of those prongs had sharp tips, which makes sense from the premise of protecting the hands holding the weapons. Erle Montaigue states that the originals used for the form he teaches had points and edges everywhere, but told me that one can use the ones without the sharp edges for safety reasons. However, once one becomes proficient, it is a final test of your ability to do the form properly using the knives with all sharpened edges.

Erle's solo form is an excellent example of how a weapon form can be demanding and simple all at the same time. I recommend it highly to those who have some skill and interest in developing a bagua weapon.

Training Tips:

• It is very difficult to use these weapons at first if you don't have very strong and flexible wrists and elbows, and many of the postures demand a great deal of precision to avoid hitting yourself in the hands and the head while practising. I have given myself some nasty cuts with the blunt metal weapons that I practise with, as have the three students who are learning this set from me.

• The applications are often quite simple if you have the requisite bagua body mechanics. One of the keys to effective application is to remember that you will often try to stick and check the attacker's weapon with one of yours while trying to slide up his weapon to cut his hand and trying to get a vital target with the other knife.

• These weapons are very good for taking off heads, and I am told that this was the tactic of preference in the old days—block or evade, and use one or both blades (in a scissoring action) to cut off the head, or, at the very least, slice through the neck. The other characteristic use of this weapon is to trap a blade between the two front prongs, and by twisting your knife suddenly wrench the weapon out of the other person's grip or, if that fails, immobilise the weapon for the moment that it takes you to counter-attack with your other knife.

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Antique Collecting

Antique Collecting

ABOUT fifty years ago, when the subject of English furniture first began to be studied and to be written about, it was divided conveniently into four distinct types. One writer called his books on the subject The Age of Oak, The Age of Walnut, The Age of Mahogany and The Age of Satinwood. It is not really quite as simple as that, for each of the so-called Ages overlaps the others and it is quite impossible to lagt down strict dates as to when any one timber was introduced or when it finally, if ever, went out of favour.

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