Counter to a Front Choke

Marines use a counter to a front choke when the opponent approaches from the front and uses both hands to choke a Marine around the throat. To execute the counter to the front choke, Marines Grasp the opponent's right forearm (where the elbow bends) with the left hand and apply downward pressure on the opponent's radial nerve with the fingers. Execute a chin jab to the opponent's chin with the right hand. To generate power into the strike, bring the left foot to the outside of the opponent's...

Pressure Points of the Body

There are nerves in the human body that, when pressure is applied or when they are struck, allow Marines to control a subject through pain compliance. Marines use pressure points to control an opponent when deadly force is not authorized. They also use pressure points to soften or distract an opponent so a lethal or nonlethal technique can be employed. The figure on page 1-5 illustrates the body's pressure points. Marines execute attacks to pressure points by i Rapidly kicking or striking...

Target Areas of the Body

During any confrontation, the parts of the opponent's body that are exposed or readily accessible will vary. The goal in a knife fight is to attack the body's soft, vital target areas that are readily accessible (e.g, the face, the sides and front of the neck, the lower abdomen or groin ). Neck. Carotid arteries, located on either side of the neck, are good target areas because they are not covered by body armor or natural protection. Lower Abdomen (or Groin). The lower abdomen (or groin...

Close Combat

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY Headquarters United States Marine Corps Washington, D C. 20380-1775 Today's Marines operate within a continuum of force where conflict may change from low intensity to high intensity over a matter of hours. Marines are also engaged in many military operations other than war, such as peacekeeping missions or noncom-batant evacuation operations, where deadly force may not be authorized. During non-combative engagements, Marines must determine if a situation warrants...

Principles of Knife Fighting

The following are key principles of knife fighting i Execute movements with the knife blade within a box, shoulder-width across from the neck down to the waistline. The opponent has a greater chance of blocking an attack if the blade is brought in a wide, sweeping movement to the opponent. i Close with the opponent, coming straight to the target. i Move with the knife in straight lines. i Point the knife's blade tip forward and toward the opponent. i Apply full body weight and power in each of...

Fundamentals of Knife Fighting

Marines must be trained in knife fighting techniques. Marines experienced in offensive knife techniques can cause enough damage and massive trauma to stop an opponent. When engaged against each other, experienced knife fighters employ various maneuvers and techniques that are specific to knife fighting. Seldom, if ever, will Marines engage an opponent in a classical knife fight. Note When armed with a rifle, Marines are issued a bayonet. When armed with a pistol, Marine are issued a combat...

Thrusting Techniques

Thrusting Techniques

The primary objective of knife fighting is to insert the blade into an opponent to cause extensive damage and trauma. This is done with a thrusting technique. Thrusting techniques are more effective than slashing techniques because of the damage they can inflict. However, Marines use slashing techniques to close with the enemy so that they are closer to the opponent, which allows them to use the thrusting technique. Vertical Thrust. The thrusting motion follows a vertical line straight up...

Rear Hand Punch

The rear hand punch is a snapping punch executed by the rear right hand. It is a power punch designed to inflict maximum damage on the opponent. Its power comes from pushing off the rear leg and rotating the hips and shoulders. To execute the rear hand punch, Marines Rotate the hips and shoulders forcefully toward the opponent and thrust the rear hand straight out, rotating the palm down, to nearly full extension. Shift body weight to the lead foot while pushing off on the ball of the rear...

Lead Hand Punch

The lead hand punch is a snapping straight punch executed by the forward or lead hand. It is a fast punch designed to keep the opponent away and to set up an attack. A lead hand punch conceals movement and allows Marines to get close to the opponent. Lead hand punches should strike soft tissue areas, if possible. To execute the lead hand punch, Marines Snap the lead hand out to nearly full extension, while rotating the palm to the ground. Contact the opponent with the first two knuckles of the...

Softening Techniques

Brachial Plexus Tie

Handgun retention techniques use softening techniques applied to pressure points. Bone pressure and strikes with the hands i.e., hammer fist , knees, and feet are also effective softening techniques. Strikes. If it is difficult to apply a retention technique, Marines employ strikes or kicks to force the opponent to loosen his grip. Strikes to the eyes, the arms radial nerve , or shoulder brachial plexus tie in soften the opponent's grip on the weapon. Pressure Points. Marines use pressure point...

Counter Techniques

Marines Close Combat

There are two techniques that can be used to counter any armed attack forward armbar counter and reverse armbar counter. These techniques can be used to counter a vertical attack, a forward diagonal strike, or a forward horizontal strike. With minor variations, the same techniques are used to counter reverse strikes. A third technique, the bent armbar counter, is used to counter a vertical attack. Forward Armbar Counter. To execute the forward armbar counter to an attack coming from a forward...

Counter to a Front Headlock

Execute Counter The Front

Marines use a counter to a front headlock when the opponent approaches from the front and puts his right arm around the Marine's neck, bends the Marine forward, and locks the Marine's head against his hip. To execute the counter to a front headlock, Marines Grasp the opponent's wrist and forearm with both hands and pull down to clear the airway. Maintain control of the opponent's wrist throughout the move. Once the airway is clear, tuck the chin to protect the airway and to prevent the opponent...

Knife Fighting Techniques Slashing Techniques

Knife Fighting

Marines use slashing techniques to close with an enemy. Slashing techniques distract the opponent or damage the opponent so Marines can close in. Typically, Marines target the opponent's limbs, but any portion of the body that is presented can become a target. Vertical Slash Technique. The vertical slash follows a vertical line straight down through the target. To execute the vertical slash, Marines Thrust the right hand out and bring the weapon straight down on the opponent, continuing to drag...

Counter to a Rear Choke

Marines execute a counter to a rear choke when the opponent approaches from the rear and puts his right arm around a Marine's throat. To execute the counter to the rear choke, Marines Grasp the opponent's forearm at the radial nerve and bicep with both hands and pull down just enough to clear the airway. Once the airway is clear, tuck the chin to protect the airway and to prevent the opponent from reapplying the choke. Step behind the opponent's right leg with the left foot, keeping both legs...

Counter to a Rear Headlock

Marines use a counter to a rear headlock when the opponent approaches from the rear and puts his right arm around the Marine's neck, bends the Marine forward, and locks the Marine's head against his hip. To execute the counter to the rear headlock, Marines Grasp the opponent's wrist and forearm with the right hand and pull down to clear the airway. Once the airway is clear, tuck the chin to protect the airway and to prevent the opponent from re-applying the choke. Reach over the opponent's...