Stopping a Bout

There are two reasons for stopping a bout delivery of a scoring blow or an unsafe condition. The close combat instructor trainer, close combat instructor, or the range safety officer may stop the bout at any time an unsafe condition is observed. Scoring Blow. A scoring blow is an offensive technique delivered to a vulnerable area of an opponent with sufficient force and precision to be considered as a disabling or killing blow. Scoring blows are not judged solely on the degree of force with...

Principles of Knife Fighting

The following are key principles of knife fighting i Execute movements with the knife blade within a box, shoulder-width across from the neck down to the waistline. The opponent has a greater chance of blocking an attack if the blade is brought in a wide, sweeping movement to the opponent. i Close with the opponent, coming straight to the target. i Move with the knife in straight lines. i Point the knife's blade tip forward and toward the opponent. i Apply full body weight and power in each of...

Fundamentals of Knife Fighting

Marines must be trained in knife fighting techniques. Marines experienced in offensive knife techniques can cause enough damage and massive trauma to stop an opponent. When engaged against each other, experienced knife fighters employ various maneuvers and techniques that are specific to knife fighting. Seldom, if ever, will Marines engage an opponent in a classical knife fight. Note When armed with a rifle, Marines are issued a bayonet. When armed with a pistol, Marine are issued a combat...

Angles of Approach

Marines move anywhere within a 360-degree circle around the opponent to gain a tactical advantage. This circle provides access to different target areas of the opponent's body. When facing an opponent, Marines move in a 45-degree angle to either side of the opponent. Moving at a 45-degree angle avoids an opponent's strike and puts Marines in the best position to attack the opponent. Marines should avoid being directly in front of an opponent during a confrontation. If a Marine is directly in...

Weapons of Opportunity

During an unarmed close combat situation, Marines use their bodies as weapons, but they should be ready and able to use anything around them as a weapon. For example, Marines could throw sand or liquid in an opponent's eyes to temporarily impair his vision or smash the opponent's head with a rock or helmet. Marines must use whatever means are available and do whatever it takes to take control of the situation and to win, or they face the possibility of losing their lives. Some weapons of...

Legs

The legs are more powerful than any other weapon of the body, and they are less prone to injury when striking. The feet are protected by boots and are the preferred choice for striking. Feet. Marines use the balls of the feet, the insteps, and the toes to kick an opponent. Marines use the cutting edge of the heels and the heels to stomp on an opponent. Marines must be wearing boots when striking with the toes. Knees. Like elbows, knees are excellent weapons in the close range of close combat....

Thrusting Techniques

Thrusting Techniques

The primary objective of knife fighting is to insert the blade into an opponent to cause extensive damage and trauma. This is done with a thrusting technique. Thrusting techniques are more effective than slashing techniques because of the damage they can inflict. However, Marines use slashing techniques to close with the enemy so that they are closer to the opponent, which allows them to use the thrusting technique. Vertical Thrust. The thrusting motion follows a vertical line straight up...

Rear Hand Punch

The rear hand punch is a snapping punch executed by the rear right hand. It is a power punch designed to inflict maximum damage on the opponent. Its power comes from pushing off the rear leg and rotating the hips and shoulders. To execute the rear hand punch, Marines Rotate the hips and shoulders forcefully toward the opponent and thrust the rear hand straight out, rotating the palm down, to nearly full extension. Shift body weight to the lead foot while pushing off on the ball of the rear...

Lead Hand Punch

The lead hand punch is a snapping straight punch executed by the forward or lead hand. It is a fast punch designed to keep the opponent away and to set up an attack. A lead hand punch conceals movement and allows Marines to get close to the opponent. Lead hand punches should strike soft tissue areas, if possible. To execute the lead hand punch, Marines Snap the lead hand out to nearly full extension, while rotating the palm to the ground. Contact the opponent with the first two knuckles of the...

Softening Techniques

Brachial Plexus Tie

Handgun retention techniques use softening techniques applied to pressure points. Bone pressure and strikes with the hands i.e., hammer fist , knees, and feet are also effective softening techniques. Strikes. If it is difficult to apply a retention technique, Marines employ strikes or kicks to force the opponent to loosen his grip. Strikes to the eyes, the arms radial nerve , or shoulder brachial plexus tie in soften the opponent's grip on the weapon. Pressure Points. Marines use pressure point...

Come Along Holds

Comealong Wristlock

Marines use a come-along hold to control and move an opponent. Escort Position. A common come-along hold is the escort position. To execute the escort position, Marines Face the opponent. Use the left foot to step forward at a 45-de-gree angle. Turn to face the right side of the opponent. Use the right hand to firmly grasp the opponent's right wrist. With the left hand, firmly grasp the opponent's right triceps. Position the opponent's controlled arm diagonally across the torso, keeping his...

Counter Techniques

Marines Close Combat

There are two techniques that can be used to counter any armed attack forward armbar counter and reverse armbar counter. These techniques can be used to counter a vertical attack, a forward diagonal strike, or a forward horizontal strike. With minor variations, the same techniques are used to counter reverse strikes. A third technique, the bent armbar counter, is used to counter a vertical attack. Forward Armbar Counter. To execute the forward armbar counter to an attack coming from a forward...

Elbow Strikes

Upwards Elbow Strike

The elbow is a powerful weapon that can be used in several different ways to attack virtually any part of an opponent's body. Elbow strikes can be performed either vertically upward or downward or horizontally forward or reverse . The striking surface is 2 inches above or below the point of the elbow, depending upon the angle of attack, the opponent's attack angle, and the position of the opponent. Vertical Elbow Strike Up . To execute an upward vertical elbow strike, Marines Contact the...

Knife Fighting Techniques Slashing Techniques

Knife Fighting

Marines use slashing techniques to close with an enemy. Slashing techniques distract the opponent or damage the opponent so Marines can close in. Typically, Marines target the opponent's limbs, but any portion of the body that is presented can become a target. Vertical Slash Technique. The vertical slash follows a vertical line straight down through the target. To execute the vertical slash, Marines Thrust the right hand out and bring the weapon straight down on the opponent, continuing to drag...

Counter to a Front Bear

Marines execute a counter to a front bear hug when the opponent approaches from the front and puts both of his arms around the Marine's body, trapping the Marine's arms to the sides. To execute the counter to a front bear hug, Marines Step forward and to the left with the left foot at a 45-degree angle to the outside of the opponent's right leg, keeping the left leg bent. Grasp the opponent's torso or arms to gain balance and to assist in throwing the opponent. It may be helpful to hook the...

Counter to a Rear Choke

Marines execute a counter to a rear choke when the opponent approaches from the rear and puts his right arm around a Marine's throat. To execute the counter to the rear choke, Marines Grasp the opponent's forearm at the radial nerve and bicep with both hands and pull down just enough to clear the airway. Once the airway is clear, tuck the chin to protect the airway and to prevent the opponent from reapplying the choke. Step behind the opponent's right leg with the left foot, keeping both legs...

Pugil Stick Training

A pugil stick is a training device used to simulate a rifle bayonet so that effective, but safe, training can be conducted to build proficiency of rifle bayonet techniques. Pugil stick training builds on the techniques used to throw punches. Pugil stick training is the only full contact training provided to Marines in the Close Combat Program. Pugil stick training teaches Marines to function when faced with stress and violence, and it prepares them to deliver a blow and take a blow. It also...