Attacking his LEFT side

Fig. 91

Assault Trip TIi row

Here you have approached your opponent's right side. You have put your right leg behind his legs and you have passed your right arm across the front of his body, clamping him tightly to you.

Twist him back over your right leg turning to your right. As shown above, frequently only one arm is necessary to throw him off his feet.

Fig. 92

Assault Trip Throw

Attacking his RIGHT side.

Fig. 92

Assault Trip Throw

Here your have approached your opponent's right side. You have used both hands for the throw.

You have twisted him off his feet. How?

By putting your left leg behind his legs and passing your left arm across the front of this body, over his belt is the spot, and passing your right hand behind him, and then grabbing your left wrist tightly with your right hand, and levering him over backwards, over your left thigh.

Here you turn to your left as you lever him back off his feet. Lift him right off the ground, balancing him over your left leg.

Fig. 93

Assault Trip Throw

Attacking his

RIGHT side.

Action Photograph.

Fig. 93

Assault Trip Throw

Here you have approached his right side. You have put your left leg behind his legs, and you have passed your left arm across the front of his waist and his left arm.

But he has managed to turn a little to his right and to pull your left arm up. Why? Because you did not put your left arm across the front of his body down low enough.

Promptly you have struck up at his jaw with your left elbow and you are striking him in the crotch with the little finger edge of your right hand before throwing him back over your left leg.

MISTAKES :

1.—You did not bend down low enough. So your left arm went across the front of his bor'y too high.

2.—Your right thumb should be tightly pressed in to your fingers for the edge-hand blow.

ASSAULT TRIP THROW

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Boxing Simplified

Boxing Simplified

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