Reachingout quickly the little finger edge of your right hand palm down strikes to your right against the outside of the blade close to his hand pushing it over to your right Fig 168

3.—Simultaneously your left hand, with palm up, scoops up against the base of the handle and against the under side of his hand, with the little finger edge of your left palm reaching up over his fingers.

Then with your left hand lever up and to your left as your right hand pushes the top of the dagger handle to your right.

This twists the knife blade down to your right between you and your opponent (Fig. 169).

4.—Twist it right around. With right hand pressure try to force the tip of the blade constantly up towards his right arm-pit bending his wrist. This is very important. You twist the dagger out of his grip against his thumb. Try to twist it right out of his hands into your hands, and stab him in the back. Left side spleen.

Right side liver. Take your choice (Fig. 170).

Danger.—Do not cut your right hand on the edge of the knife. (Incidentally remember while doing this movement that he has a crotch and you have practised knee-blow calisthenics. Always crouch low. Bend forward.)

When is this defence movement most useful? When you are wearing gloves, or mitts, in winter fighting. Practise with gloves on.

Your right hand pushes to your right against the top of the dagger handle and your left hand pushes up to your left against the bottom of the dagger handle.

Fig. 1 GO

Twist the blade down and around, keeping the tip of the blade pointing towards him and constantly forcing it up. Lever the dagger out of his grip.

Fig. 170

Then with the dagger in both hands, stab down putting all your weight behind the thrust.

THE LEFT HAND GRIP "ROLL" DEFENCE AGAINST AN UPWARD THRUST

How to flip a knife out of an opponent's hand.

Situation :

The enemy stabs up at you with the dagger held in his right hand, blade up.

1.—Turn to your right out of the thrust, stepping back your right foot and crouching down, then grab down on his right wrist with your left hand. Your thumb points down, and your fingers go over the inside of his wrist (Fig. 171).

2.—With the little finger edge of your stiffened out right palm, which faces down, strike to your right against the top of the dagger handle which often projects a little above his fist. Strike to your right and down (Fig. 172).

3.—Now keeping the edge of your right hand pressing firmly against the dagger there, push it further down, levering it under his hand (Fig. 173).

4.—Then turning your palm down, bend his wrist in with the back of your right hand pressing against the dagger near the handle (Fig. 174).

5.—Slide your right hand onto the top of your left wrist, then push the back your right wrist forward, against the dagger (Fig. 175). Pry it out of his grip by levering your right wrist forward.

This requires practice and experimentation. If you don't get it the first time, try again, trying to reason out any mistake. Try it several times, until you get the desired result.

Danger: Unless you are wearing gloves you may cut yourself on the dagger. This defense movement is especially adaptable to winter fighting, when mitts are worn.

A Tip: Always attempt to lever the dagger handle against his thumb, and to bend in his wrist.

GeneraI Rule: When a wrist is bent in, the power to grasp anything is then reduced.

Professor C. P. Martin, of the Department of Anatomy at Mc-Gill University has shown that there is a perfectly logical anatomical explanation for this.

To prove this to yourself, bend in your right wrist as far as you can, so that it forms a right angle with your forearm. Then try to squeeze a cigarette package with your finger tips, keeping your wrist bent in.

You will find that your fingers have lost much of their grig-ping power. Then straighten your hand out and try again to crush the cigarette package with your finger tips. It is comparatively more easy now. (Have you taken the cigarettes out of the package?)

Fig. 171

Holding a dagger pointing upward in his right hand, vour enemy has stabbed up at you. Fortunately you have managed to grab down on his right wrist with your left hand. How? Grabbing from his right side your left hand is turned so that your fingers go over the inside of his wrist, with your thumb against the outside of his wrist. Your thumb is the weak spot in your grip, so follow-through quickly.

Fig. 172

Still holding his wrist with your left hand, so the blade of the knife points almost vertically upward, you strike against the top of the dagger handle at the base of the blade with the little finger edge of your right palm. Your palm faces down and you strike to your right. Your fingers are held out straight, tightly together.

Fig. 172

Still holding his wrist with your left hand, so the blade of the knife points almost vertically upward, you strike against the top of the dagger handle at the base of the blade with the little finger edge of your right palm. Your palm faces down and you strike to your right. Your fingers are held out straight, tightly together.

Fig. 173

Still holding his wrist with your left hand, after knocking the dagger to your right with the edge of your ri^ht hand, you lever it down with the edge of your hand, and push it under his wrist, around to vour left. Your right palm now faces up.

(Your next movement in forcing the dagger to your left, is to turn your wrist so you right palm faces down, pushing the dagger to your left all the time.)

Fig. 173

Still holding his wrist with your left hand, after knocking the dagger to your right with the edge of your ri^ht hand, you lever it down with the edge of your hand, and push it under his wrist, around to vour left. Your right palm now faces up.

(Your next movement in forcing the dagger to your left, is to turn your wrist so you right palm faces down, pushing the dagger to your left all the time.)

Fig. 174

After pushing the dagger to your left, lever it up between your left arm and your body, bending in his wrist to loosen his grip. You are pressing against the dagger now with the back of your right wrist.

Fig. 174

After pushing the dagger to your left, lever it up between your left arm and your body, bending in his wrist to loosen his grip. You are pressing against the dagger now with the back of your right wrist.

Fig. 175

Now slide your right hand onto the top of your left wrist, bringing your right elbow forward so the dagger is pressed forward by the angle between the back of your right hand and your right forearm.

Now with a forward flip of your right wrist you may lever the knife out of his hand.

Practise these movements until you get them accurately. Fit the positions in snugly.

HOW TO FLIP A CLUB OUT OF AN OPPONENT'S HAND

The methods of fighting illustrated in this book may be applied effectively to many circumstances other than those described. For instance the movements in the "Left Hand Grip 'Roll' Defence Against an Upward Thrust of a Dagger", just described, may be used to disarm a man who strikes down at you with a club.

Situation :

With a club in his right hand, your opponent strikes down at vour head.

General Instructions :

1.—First, prevent being hit. Naturally. Crouch down, and grip his wrist with your left hand. Keep your right wrist crossed in front of your face immediately behind your left wrist as a secondary defence against the blow (Fig. 176). Your right hand is kept in position for edge-hand blows, with fingers out straight and close together.

2.—Still holding his right wrist in your left hand, push the club down to your right by forcing against the club just above his grip with the little finger edg£ of your right hand, palm facing down (Fig. 177).

Fig. 176

lie strikes down at your head. Cross your rialit hand behind vour left wrist. Grab his wrist with your left hand, and at the same time strike up against his wrist near his hand with the little finger edge of your right wrist or stiffened out hand.

Fig. 177

Keeping your right hand out stiff, slip it over his fist against the club just above his grip. Push the club to your right and down with the little finger edge of your right hand.

3.—Push the club down then swing it around and up to your left by pushing it with your right wrist. If he still hangs on to the club, his wrist will be twisted around into such a position that a firm grip is difficult for him to maintain {Fig. 178).

Fig. 178

After pushing the club down past a horizontal position, keep your right palm facing down by turning your hand around, and push the club to your left with the thumb edge of your right rcrl.it.

4.—Lower your left elbow and slide your right hand on top of your left wrist, up close to the club handle.

Then force your right wrist forward, levering the club out of his grip as his wrist is bent. To gain leverage, press your fingevs against your left wrist as you raise your right wrist forward against the club (Fig. 179).

Remember to employ "Blow Power" in all these methods, before and after you have obtained your objective.

Fig. 179

Lowering your left elbow, reach the fingers of your right hand on to the TOP of your left wrist under the club. Keep your right wrist pressing against the club close to his fist.

Then a forward flip of your right wTrist against the club will bend his wrist in and lever the club out of his grasp.

Keep your left hand grip firmly on his right wrist throughout these movements.

Your opponent may turn to his right with you. Watch out for this!

The fundamental point here is turning his wrist around and bending it in on itself, so his hand looses its gripping power.

ARM-LOCK DEFENCE AGAINST AN UPWARD THRUST

Situation :

Your enemy holds a dagger in his right hand with the blade pointing up and he stabs up at you.

Criticism :

More likely he would weave the dagger about so you would not know when or where he's going to stab you. That is true enough. When your enemy holds a dagger in his hand and you're unarmed, the odds'are against you. Rut if you have practised some definite movements of defence then you will have a better chance of defeating him. The more methods you know, the better your chance, and

the less you have to rely on luck. What may you do?

1.—With your left wrist, thumb down and the palm of your left hand turned towards him, knock his wrist to your right and a little up. Turn right as you do this (Fig. 180).

Why turn right?

(2) To give power to your left hand blow.

You turn right for only a "fraction" of a second, then swing around to your left as,

2.—Your left forearm pushes his right wrist further up and towards him, probably bending his elbow.

3.—Your right FOREARM goes over his right forearm, your right elbow bend clamping his wrist tightly, then slide your right WRIST under your left forearm and your right HAND goes over your left upper arm just above your left elbow (Fig. 181).

Clamp in tightly to get this. In early practice bring your elbows close together after you have applied the lock. Then to increase pressure about his wrist pull your elbows away from each other. Keep your palms down and the little finger edge of your hands facing forwards and slightly up.

4.—Lever the knife away. Force your left wrist forward against his right wrist. Pull his elbow into you snugly, by tugging down and into your stomach with your right arm, which clamps the upper limit of his forearm near his elbow.

Your right forearm in its turn may be forced down against his right shoulder and chest as you lever his forearm back.

5.—You may put your right leg behind him in an attempt to trip him backwards, or instead you may lever him down by leaning forward and stepping back with your right foot and going down on your right knee, applying pressure on his arm with your lock.

At anytime be ready to deliver a right edge-hand blow to the right side of his neck.

ADVICE : Watch his left fist.

Keep the fingers, wrist and forearm of your right arm straight, stiffened out like a plank. On occasion you may slip your right hand out and give him an edge-hand blow with your right hand against the right side of his neck. Remember crotch blows with your knees.

In the mastering of all these methods there is an important fact to realize:

Instructions followed rigidly, may work one hundred percent against one man of a certain height, strength and weight, but they will not work so well against another man of a different physique.

The "Art" of Arwrology involves to a great extent the ability to modify each and every method to the various types of opponents.

In time, you will acquire little tricks of your own which will help YOU to smooth out your difficulties and to overcome your enemies.

Fig. 180

He thrusts up. Your left hand swoops around and knocks his wrist away to your right. Note that you strike with the little finger edge of your left hand and wrist.

Observe the defender's lythe, powerful position—shortened neck, tight stiffened fingers, lowered right shoulder. That's technique.

Fig. 181

With your left hand you have forced his right hand back. Your right arm has gone around his forearm over his bent elbow, then UNDER YOUR LEFT wrist. Then your right hand goes on TOP of your left upper arm. Clamp snugly. Keep his forearm VERTICAL. Lever his hand away and his elbow into you.

(You may lever him over backwards, pressing your right elbow AGAINST his right shoulder. When he's down don't forget a foot on the knife, and kicks.)

"ARM ABOUT TWIST" DEFENCE AGAINST A

DOWNWARD THRUST

Situation : Your enemy holds a dagger in his right hand, with the blade pointing down, and he wildly stabs down at you.

2.—With the palm of your right hand facing forward, grab up at his right wrist.

3.—Then pull his arm around to your right, pushing the back of his right elbow with your left hand (Fig. 183).

4.—Pull his right wrist to your right hip,—keeping the dagger pointing away from you all the time, naturally. Turn a little to your right.

5.—Lever him down pushing the BACK of his right elbow forward and pulling back on his right wrist (Figs. 184 and 185). Your left leg put across the front of his legs will help to trip him forward.

6.—When he's down, lever the knife out of his hand, stepping on the knife or on his hand if necessary.

And remember the rule: "When he's down, follow up." Don't just think that because he's down, he's overcome.

Tip: When learning this method, have your opponent stab down at you repeatedly with some harmless object, so that you may develop good eye and muscle co-ordination.

Occasionally have your partner pick up your left leg with his left hand, during this defence when you place your left leg across the front of his legs. Practise immediately giving a left edge-hand blow against the right side of his neck or against his ribs as soon as he pulls up your leg.

Fig. 182

Wildly he stabs down at you. Keep low.

Fig. 183

Your right hand, with palm facing forward, grabs up at his right wrist with your thumb going under his wrist and your fingers going over the top of his wrist. Your left hand, fingers pointing upward, pushes the back of his right elbow up to your right.

Pull his right wrist down and around, holding it tightly to your right side. Your left hand pushes his elbow forward?—Then put your left leg across the front of his less.

Fig. 185

Lever him down. Then disarm him and follow up

ARM-LOCK DEFENCE AGAINST A DOWNWARD JAB.

In the last defence against a downward thrust, we assumed that you could grab your opponent's wrist. But that is not always easily done.

Think back. What method already described, with which

you do not have to grab his wrist, could be used against a downward stab?

You may use the principle of "No. 3, Arm-Lock Defence Against An Upward Thrust." (Figs. 180, 181).

When your opponent stabs down at you with a dagger held pointing down in his right hand, with your left wrist knock his right wrist up. Loop your right arm over his right forearm and slide your right hand under your left forearm onto the top of your left upper arm. Clamp his arm tightly (Fig. 186). Then follow through as already described.

Give him blows with your knees. Guard your head and body with your right elbow against a left hand blow. Bring him to the ground.

big. 186

You have guarded against a downward stab by knocking his right wrist up with your left wrist. Then looping your right arm over his arm, slide your right hand under your left forearm on to the top of your left upper arm. Clamp his arm tightly.

Lever him back. Get the dagger. Then get him.

There are various other arm-locks which may be used here in certain circumstances, but they are relatively less efficient.

One is very similar to this lock except that instead of knocking his right wrist up with your left wrist, you knock it up with your right wrist.

Instructions: As he stabs down at you with the dagger held in his right hand, knock up his right wrist with your right wrist, at the same time sliding your left arm over his right arm. Then slip your left hand down between his wrist and your right wrist, going under your right wrist to press against the thumb edge of your right wrist. Force his arm back.

If you can follow that you'd make a good mathematician, and Arwrologist too!

Another hold is a two hand grip on his wrist with one thumb crossing over the other. Painful crushing pressure may sometimes be exerted over the bones of his wrist by this method.

Beware of his other arm.

What Next?

These are just a few of the more simple methods which may be of use when either you or your opponent has a dagger. There are other, more dramatic methods. These are described in another volume.

They include such tricks as defending yourself against a right hand upward stab by grabbing down on his right wrist with both hands, with your thumbs crossing over the thumb edge of his wrist, and your fingers, which point towards his fingers, clasping under his wrist.

Then swinging your left elbow and arm over his right arm and tugging his arm down and away from his body, duck your left shoulder and head under his right arm-pit. Then heave him back over your right shoulder so that the dagger, still in his hand, can be twisted towards him and forcefully driven into his stomach as you throw him over your head.

Remember that a man fighting for his life nearly always pulls in his arm tightly to his body whenever his wrist is grasped. Unless you are fast and thorough, and direct his attention elsewhere by kicks and knee blows, many problems may arise. It is always wise to direct your opponent's attention away from the part of his body which you intend to attack.

When both you and your enemy are armed with a dagger, other special methods are applicable and these will be described in future volumes on Arwrology.

ADDITIONAL NOTES FROM INSTRUCTOR ON CHAPTER 3.

Chapter 4

BAYONET THRUST DEFENCE-OFFENSE

MOVEMENT.

When describing fighting methods with a dagger or a bayonet used as a dagger, it is worth while mentioning at least one defence-offense movement for an unarmed man against an enemy armed with rifle and bayonet.

A dagger has a handle which may be used to deliver back-hand blows, and a rifle with bayonet has a steel capped butt which may be used to deliver blows with.

Be prepared for either end of a dagger or a rifle with bayonet. The following method is described so as to give the unarmed man something to practise so that he will know what it feels like to be against a man armed with rifle and bayonet, and to eliminate some of the surprise element. It is an example of one of the many methods wThich an unarmed soldier may attempt in defending himself against a bayonet thrust. Actually the odds are against you. Kicks, knee blows and edge-hand blows should always be used.

Problem Facing You :

One of the enemy runs at you with his rifle gripped tightly in his hands and his bayonet going straight for your chest.

You are standing unarmed in front of him.

General Directions :

1.—First push yourself away from the rifle. Do not try to push the rifle away. There is a difference. Assume that he is much stronger than you are.

As he thrusts forward at your chest, strike against the rifle barrel just a little further toward the muzzle than his left hand grip. The blow is given with the little finger edge of your left hand, your hand pointing down, your wrist turned so that your palm, open, faces him. Your fingers and thumb are held tightly together, out stiff. At the same time, straighten out your left arm, pushing yourself away from the rifle.

Swerve back to your right, with your right foot going back, thus facing him sideways, on his right side. You have now pushed yourself away from the rifle. This is a most important point, because if you do not push yourself out of line of the bayonet thrust in time, knowledge of many holds will not be of much use.

2.—Now grasp the rifle barrel with your left hand. How? After hitting the barrel to your right with the little finger edge of your open left hand, which points down, twist your palm around so it faces forward then your thumb which points down, can slip over the top of the barrel. Grip the barrel tightly, your fingers curling under the right side of the barrel.

Pull the bayonet end of the rifle up over to your left, between you and your enemy. Slide your right hand, palm up and open, under your left arm in order to grab the other end of the rifle, just a little above his right hand grip (Fig. 187).

3.—Your right hand is held palm up as though you were a waiter balancing a tray. Hook the rifle in the angle between your thumb and fingers. Your fingers are held tightly together. Push the butt end of the rifle down to your right between you and your enemy. Lever the butt of the rifle down and to your right with your right hand grip, keeping your right elbow in tightly to your right side to contribute firmness. At the same moment with your left hand grip on the rifle barrel you pull it up and to your left. Get in close to him, leading with a powerful right knee blow

BAYONET THRUST DEFENCE-OFFENSE 211

MOVEMENT

into his crotch (Figs. 188 and 191). (Remember the Knee Blow Psycho-Physical Calisthenics?)

4.—Then twist the muzzle of the gun DOWN to your left and flip UP the butt trying to strike the left side of his head with the butt, thus tearing the rifle out of his grasp (Fig. 189).

5.—Still keeping your same grip on the rifle, swing the butt across the front of your face to your left so the butt lies on top of your left shoulder.

Here your right arm is across the front of your chest above your left arm. Your right hand grips downward on the rifle, butt end, and your left hand grips upward on the rifle, bayonet end. Aim the bayonet at your enemy (Fig. 190).

From this position you can heave the rifle a javelin, or thrust forward, or swing the butt down or around like a club.

Fig. 187

Suppose your opponent on the left has made a forward lunge at you with the bayonet on his rifle.

Guard against the bayonet by striking the end of the rifle with the little finger edge of your left hand, palm facing him, and jump to his right. Then, as shown above, grasp the end of the rifle a little up from his left hand, with your thumb looping over the barrel and your fingers grabbing under the right side of the upper end of the rifle.

Slip your right hand under your left with palm up to grab the rifle just above his right hand grip, as your left hand pulls the upper end of his rifle over to your left.

Fig. 188

Your right hand, palm up, fingers stiffly together and thumb out, grabs the rifle in the angle between your fingers and thumb just above his right hand grip and pulls it up to your right.

With left hand swing the bayonet end of the rifle up over to your left, and with your right hand, which now grabs up on the rifle more firmly, push the butt end further up to your right.

Give a hard right lcnee blow to his crotch while you are twisting the rifle around.

(Remember the rule : "When he grabs with both hands, Strike!" Here he's grabbing his rifle with both hands. So give a powerful high knee blow to his crotch to induce him to loosen his grip 011 the rifle.)

Fig. 18.9

Swing the butt of the rifle up against the right side of his face and pull the bayonet end down to your left. Make that knee blow count. c

Fig.

Keep your same grip on the your left shoulder. The bayonet

rifle and swing the butt end on end is aimed at your opponent.

Fig.

Keep your same grip on the your left shoulder. The bayonet

rifle and swing the butt end on end is aimed at your opponent.

BAYONET THRUST DEFENCE OFFENSE MOVEMENT

Criticism : Too complicated. Practically have to be an expert to rely on it.

Other methods : Naturally in order to cope with attack from various angles, you should practice many other methods for defence against a rifle with bavonet assault. Most of these methods suggest grabbing the rifle near the bayonet with

one hand and near the butt with the other, and twisting the rifle around out of your opponent's grip. Occasionally you can put a leg behind your opponent and trip him back over it, or grabbing the rifle and ducking down low and turning vour back to him you can throw him over vour head, "flying mare" style.

A Simple and Effective Method.

As your opponent thrusts forward, with your left hand push the bayonet end of the rifle to your right, grabbing it tightly.

Then swing your right arm over the barrel end of the gun, clamping it tightly in your right arm-pit, and slide your right hand under the rifle, gripping it tightly near the middle.

Pull the rifle and your opponent to you and give a back edge-hand blow at his neck with your left hand, and give knee-to-crotch blows. (A Step Back Trip Throw may be used here sometimes.)

Fig. 191

The knee blow- to his crotch is very important. It generally induces him to slacken his grip on the rifle.

ADDITIONAL NOTES FROM INSTRUCTOR ON CHAPTER 4.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Boxing Simplified

Boxing Simplified

Devoted as I am to popularizing amateur boxing and to improving the caliber of this particularly desirable competitive sport, I am highly enthusiastic over John Walsh's boxing instruction book. No one in the United States today can equal John's record as an amateur boxer and a coach. He is highly regarded as a sportsman. Before turning to coaching and the practice of law John was one of the most successful college and Golden Gloves boxers the sport has ever known.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment