Countering kick to sweepkick takedown

Catching an opponent's kicks is not something that you should look for—it's something that just sort of happens. The reason you shouldn't look for it is because if your opponent sees that you're trying to catch all of his kicks, he will use your reactions against you. He might fake a kick and then throw a punch as you drop your arm. He might throw a few kicks toward your ribs, get you comfortable with dropping your arm to catch them, and then throw a kick to your head. Unless you are an experienced Muay Thai practitioner, it can be difficult to tell the difference between a rib kick and a head kick, and the last thing you want is to catch a shin across the side of your neck. Usually the only time I will catch an opponent's kick is when I can't get out of the way in time or if I am too slow rushing in for the takedown. Once you have caught the kick, it is important to wrap it up tight so he can't pull it free, just like you would when going for an ankle lock. Your opponent will have very little balance, and to topple him over all you have to do is kick his planted leg out from underneath him. If your goal is to bring the fight to the ground, you can do this the moment you snatch up his leg. If you're in no rush to bring the fight down or want to keep the fight standing, you can unload from this position with an assortment of strikes, including punches to his face, knees to his body, or kicks to his planted leg.

I'm in a standard fighting stance, squared with Paco in the pocket.

off Reading Paco's movements, I see that he is about to throw a right roundhouse kick. Immediately I throw my right hand forward to push Paco off balance and eliminate some of the power behind his kick. I also begin dropping my left arm in preparation to catch his leg. If you're uncertain as to whether or not the kick is headed toward your ribs, a better approach is to check your opponent's kick.

Pushing on Paco's chest with my right hand, I eliminate some of the power behind his kick. This not only makes the impact less painful, but it also makes it easier for me to secure his leg, which I do by hooking my left arm around the outside of his right leg.

I'm in a standard fighting stance, squared with Paco in the pocket.

off Reading Paco's movements, I see that he is about to throw a right roundhouse kick. Immediately I throw my right hand forward to push Paco off balance and eliminate some of the power behind his kick. I also begin dropping my left arm in preparation to catch his leg. If you're uncertain as to whether or not the kick is headed toward your ribs, a better approach is to check your opponent's kick.

Pushing on Paco's chest with my right hand, I eliminate some of the power behind his kick. This not only makes the impact less painful, but it also makes it easier for me to secure his leg, which I do by hooking my left arm around the outside of his right leg.

Squeezing my left arm tight around Paco's leg, I take a step forward with my right foot and drive him backwards with my right hand.

As my weight comes down onto my right foot, I kick/sweep Paco's left leg out from underneath him, sending him to the mat.

As Paco lands on his back, I keep my left arm hooked around his right leg for control. From here I can begin working to pass his guard.

Squeezing my left arm tight around Paco's leg, I take a step forward with my right foot and drive him backwards with my right hand.

As my weight comes down onto my right foot, I kick/sweep Paco's left leg out from underneath him, sending him to the mat.

As Paco lands on his back, I keep my left arm hooked around his right leg for control. From here I can begin working to pass his guard.

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Boxing Simplified

Boxing Simplified

Devoted as I am to popularizing amateur boxing and to improving the caliber of this particularly desirable competitive sport, I am highly enthusiastic over John Walsh's boxing instruction book. No one in the United States today can equal John's record as an amateur boxer and a coach. He is highly regarded as a sportsman. Before turning to coaching and the practice of law John was one of the most successful college and Golden Gloves boxers the sport has ever known.

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