Hammer Fist to Elbow Counter

When postured up in your opponent's guard, a good option is to rain down a plethora of strikes and work to pass. In reaction to this, your opponent might wrap a hand around the back of your head and attempt to pull you back down into his guard. As he does this, his face becomes vulnerable, and you can make use of that vulnerability by smashing a hammer fist into his nose and jaw. If your opponent is stubborn and refuses to release his grip on your head, a good tactic is to grab his wrist, remove his hand from your neck, and then throw an over-the-top elbow.

Hiperbilirrubinemia

I pull Reagan's hand away from my head and posture up. It is important to notice that I do not let go of his wrist.

Holding Reagan's left wrist with my right hand, I rotate my right shoulder to get my right elbow above his left arm. Once I achieve this, I drop my elbow toward his face.

Driving my weight forward and continuing to rotate my shoulder, I smash my elbow into Reagan's face.

I quickly return to my defensive posture.

£ elbow to thigh to straight right

Pulling my right arm straight down, I drive the tip of my right elbow into the top of Mark's left thigh.

Immediately after digging my elbow into Mark's thigh, I snap my right fist straight into his jaw.

Pulling my right arm straight down, I drive the tip of my right elbow into the top of Mark's left thigh.

Immediately after digging my elbow into Mark's thigh, I snap my right fist straight into his jaw.

I'm postured up in Mark's full guard.

I raise my right arm in preparation to throw a downward elbow to Mark's thigh.

To do damage to your opponent from the top guard position, you often have to get creative. In this sequence, I drop my elbow down to my opponent's thigh and then immediately follow up with a right hand to his face. By throwing my first strike low, I force my opponent to think about the bottom half of his body, which takes a portion of his focus away from his top half. Although the low/high striking concept works a little differently on the ground than it does in the standing position, it's still an excellent tactic to get inside your opponent's head and create openings.

I'm postured up in Mark's full guard.

I raise my right arm in preparation to throw a downward elbow to Mark's thigh.

Twisting my body in a clockwise direction, I place my right hand on Mark's left leg and press down. My intentions aren't to open his guard, but rather to get him to focus on his legs rather than protecting his face.

The ploy works and Mark leaves his face wide open. I capitalize by coming over the top with a strong overhand right.

I'm in Mark's full guard.

Twisting my body in a clockwise direction, I place my right hand on Mark's left leg and press down. My intentions aren't to open his guard, but rather to get him to focus on his legs rather than protecting his face.

The ploy works and Mark leaves his face wide open. I capitalize by coming over the top with a strong overhand right.

Boxing Simplified

Boxing Simplified

Devoted as I am to popularizing amateur boxing and to improving the caliber of this particularly desirable competitive sport, I am highly enthusiastic over John Walsh's boxing instruction book. No one in the United States today can equal John's record as an amateur boxer and a coach. He is highly regarded as a sportsman. Before turning to coaching and the practice of law John was one of the most successful college and Golden Gloves boxers the sport has ever known.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment