Vus

secure the mount, I my heels togeth-underneath Albert's

my right leg over Albert's left leg, and I slide left leg over Albert's right leg. Immediately I both legs to the mat to eliminate space, mak-it very difficult for Albert to put me back into half guard.

secure the mount, I my heels togeth-underneath Albert's my right leg over Albert's left leg, and I slide left leg over Albert's right leg. Immediately I both legs to the mat to eliminate space, mak-it very difficult for Albert to put me back into half guard.

No-Hand Pass to Side Control

in Albert's half I've got a right my left arm wrapped underneath head, my hands are together under left shoulder, and weight le my right leg to the mat on Alright side. Once ht leg is clear, I side control by tepping out with my left leg and flattening hips to the mat.

off my right I get my head mat and drive left shoulder into s face. I then my hips in the air maneuver my left to the inside of s right knee.

Although I personally like to utilize the no-hand pass to transition from half guard into the mount, it doesn't mean that using the pass to move into side control isn't a good option. If your opponent is blocking the mount or your mount is weak and you're an expert at delivering strikes from side control, you'll probably want to transition into side control. But you should still learn how to make both transitions. Every time the no-hand pass becomes available, you'll be surrounded by a different set of variables. You have to take into consideration the strengths and weaknesses of your opponent. You have to take into consideration the openings he is offering you. If you become just as proficient working from side control as you are from the mount, the passing technique you choose to utilize will be based less on your personal limitations and more on the situation at hand.

in Albert's half I've got a right my left arm wrapped underneath head, my hands are together under left shoulder, and weight continue to elevate my hips and drive my left shoulder into s face. As I do this, I pry his legs open by forcing my left to the mat. Instead of wedging my right knee over Albert's leg as I did in the previous technique, I turn my hips in a direction and wedge my right knee underneath my left . It is importance to notice that I'm maintaining my base during the transition by keeping my weight forward and driving my eft shoulder into Albert's face.

le my right leg to the mat on Alright side. Once ht leg is clear, I side control by tepping out with my left leg and flattening hips to the mat.

off my right I get my head mat and drive left shoulder into s face. I then my hips in the air maneuver my left to the inside of s right knee.

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