Knee to Side

Throwing knee strikes to your opponent's body from the top side-control position probably won't win you the fight, but they can wear your opponent down and rack up some points on the judges' scorecards. To execute this technique, you want to come up onto the knee closest to your opponent's head and extend your other leg straight back. As you quickly drive your knee toward your opponent's ribs, you want to brace his body with both arms to ensure he absorbs the full brunt of the blow. Once you've landed a few shots, go for a submission, make your transition to the mount, or shift your base so you can land some punches and elbows. Although it is possible to remain in this position, landing one knee strike after another, your opponent will most likely move while under fire, giving you better options.

I'm in standard side control.

Bending my right knee to make it as sharp as possible, I drive it forward into Butch's right side.

I drop my hips and reset my base.

I'm in standard side control.

As I come up onto my left knee, I throw my right leg straight back.

Bending my right knee to make it as sharp as possible, I drive it forward into Butch's right side.

I drop my hips and reset my base.

As I come up onto my left knee, I throw my right leg straight back.

Knee to Head

Bending my left leg to make it as sharp as possible, I drive my knee into the side of Butch's face.

I'm in standard side control.

Still pressing my weight forward, I lift my left leg straight into the air.

Dropping my hips flat to the mat, I reestablish my base.

Landing a knee to your opponent's head from the top side-control position is a great option if the event you're competing in allows it. If it lands, there is a high probability that the fight will come to a dramatic end. At the very least, your opponent will be fazed. The mechanics of this technique are similar to landing a knee to your opponent's body, except here you are striking with the knee closest to his head. It is important to notice how I drive my head forward and to the ground for the attack. This allows me to maintain my base and keep my weight over the top of my opponent as I strike. It is also key to notice that I post my left arm next to my opponent's head. This limits the mobility of his head, which ensures that he absorbs the ftill impact of the knee. To get the most out of this technique, you want to get your hips and leg high off the ground and then drive all of your weight downward.

I'm in standard side control.

Still pressing my weight forward, I lift my left leg straight into the air.

Placing my right knee against Butch's right hip, I elevate my hips by coming up onto my right knee and left foot. As I drive my weight forward and get my head to the mat, I press my left arm against the left side of Butch's head to trap it in place.

Bending my left leg to make it as sharp as possible, I drive my knee into the side of Butch's face.

Dropping my hips flat to the mat, I reestablish my base.

I'm in side control.

I straighten my right leg as I slide it out from underneath my left leg. To switch my base completely, I step my left leg further back. With my hips facing Paco's head, I cup the left side of his face with my left hand and keep my right elbow wedged tight against his left hip.

Pushing off my right leg, I lift my left leg off the mat.

Turning my hips over, I bring my left knee over the top and then angle it down toward Paco's face.

knees to head (option 2)

This knee strike comes in handy from the top side-control position when your opponent uses his near arm to protect himself from the previous knee strike, which comes straight in at his head. To get past your opponent's guard, you want to switch your base so that your hips are facing his head, and then slide the leg you still have on the mat underneath your elevated leg. If you look at the photos below, you will notice how this prevents your opponent from posting his arm on the leg you're attacking with. This allows you to bring your attacking leg up and over your opponent's arm, and then down to his face.

I'm in side control.

Posting on my left leg, I switch my base by sliding my right leg underneath my left.

Rotating my hips all the way over, I crash my left knee into I step my left foot behind my right leg to reestablish my

Paco's jaw. base.

I'm in the modified side control with my back facing Paco's legs. My right elbow is pressed securely against his left hip and my legs are flared out to maintain my base. It is important to position your weight directly over your opponent to prevent him from scrambling.

Boxing Simplified

Boxing Simplified

Devoted as I am to popularizing amateur boxing and to improving the caliber of this particularly desirable competitive sport, I am highly enthusiastic over John Walsh's boxing instruction book. No one in the United States today can equal John's record as an amateur boxer and a coach. He is highly regarded as a sportsman. Before turning to coaching and the practice of law John was one of the most successful college and Golden Gloves boxers the sport has ever known.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment