Kneeing Against the Cage

Landing knees to your opponent's thighs or midsection while pressing him up against the cage usually won't end the fight, but they can wear him down over time and score you points on the judges' scorecards.

I've got Butch pinned up against the cage. Notice how I've positioned my left foot behind me.

Keeping Butch pinned against the cage with my left shoulder and hands, I drive a low left knee into his left thigh.

I return to my normal stance and reset my base.

After resetting my base, I mix things up by throwing my right knee at the exact same spot on Butch's left thigh.

I drop my right foot back and reset my base.

I execute a switch step, putting my left leg back. This creates the space I need to drive a straight left knee into Butch's midsection.

I drive a left knee straight into Butch's midsection. It is important to notice that my knee is going more forward than upward. This not only ensures a more damaging shot, but it also helps you maintain your balance.

I drop my left foot down and return to my normal stance.

Using my right under-hook, I lift Troy away from my legs. As I do this, I turn my hips in a counterclockwise direction so that I'm not pinned flat against the cage. From here I will work to pin Troy's back against the cage.

Using my right under-hook, I lift Troy away from my legs. As I do this, I turn my hips in a counterclockwise direction so that I'm not pinned flat against the cage. From here I will work to pin Troy's back against the cage.

pummeling forunder-hooks to switch counter

When your opponent pins you up against the cage and begins working for a takedown, a good option is to turn your hips at an angle so they're not flat against the cage. This creates space between your opponent's body and your body, allowing you to pummel an arm in for an under-hook, lift your opponent's body away from your legs, spin him around, and trap him against the cage as I demonstrate below. Achieving these goals usually requires a battle, and the best way to avoid that battle is not to let your opponent pin you against the fence in the first place.

Troy has pinned me up against the cage. He is low on my hips, working for the takedown.

Immediately I work to get Troy off my legs. I begin by turning my hips in a clockwise direction. This creates space between Troy's body and my body, which allows me to pummel my right arm across the right side of his head and underneath his left arm.

I step away from the cage with my right foot and then follow with my left. As I do this, I pivot on my left foot in a counterclockwise direction to turn Troy around. It is important to note that I'm pulling down on Troy's right arm with my left arm, and I'm driving my right under-hook upward.

Pull Hooking Driver

Continuing to pivot in a counterclockwise direction, I begin driving my weight into Troy to pin him against the cage.

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I pin Troy up against the cage.

I pin Troy up against the cage.

Continuing to pivot in a counterclockwise direction, I begin driving my weight into Troy to pin him against the cage.

Kneeing Self Defence

I hook my left arm around the inside of Reagan's left leg and clasp my hands together.

Reagan has pinned me up against the cage. He is low on my hips, working for a takedown.

Reagan is super tight against my hips, making it difficult to pummel in for an under-hook. To avoid the takedown, I reach my left arm over his body and begin hooking it around the inside of his left leg.

I hook my left arm around the inside of Reagan's left leg and clasp my hands together.

Kick Boxing Guide

Kick Boxing Guide

This is a guide that will help you learn everything you are needing to know about kick boxing. You will learn such things as all the safety tips, misconceptions, perfect workouts, all the basics and so much more.

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