Overhand Right Counter to De La Riva Sweep

In order to close the distance between us and land an overhand right, Paco pulls my left leg away from his body using his left hand.

I've assumed the De La Riva guard position by wrapping my right leg all the way around Paco's left leg, hooking my right foot around his inner left thigh, placing my left foot on his left hip to maintain distance, and latching onto his left ankle with my right hand for control.

When I'm in the De La Riva position and my opponent drops in with a big overhand punch, there are three options that I utilize. With jiu-jitsu being my specialty, I usually prefer this option because it not only allows me to bring the fight to the ground, but it also puts me in the top position. As my opponent throws the overhand, I'll make a shell with my knee and elbow on the side of my body the punch is heading toward, and then collapse my legs and pull him into me. Due to this action and the fact that the overhand requires serious commitment, my opponent loses balance and comes down on top of me. From there, I utilize the De La Riva guard to sweep him over to his back.

The instant Paco pulls my left leg away from his body, I draw my left knee toward my head and to the inside of my left elbow. This creates a barrier on the left side of my body that protects me from the overhand. In addition to this, I also lift my left arm above my head to catch the punch early in its descent.

As Paco throws the overhand, his momentum carries his weight forward and down. I help aid this progression by balling up and drawing his body into me using my right De La Riva hook. It is important to notice how I wrap my left arm around Paco's head to control his posture. This will help me sweep him over.

Instead of wrapping both of my legs around Paco's waist and pulling full guard, I plant my left foot on his right hip.

Still with my knees up toward my chest, I continue to sweep Paco over using my legs. It is important to notice that by straightening my right leg, I trap Paco's right leg and hindering him from bringing it back down to the mat. It is also important to notice that I'm still using my left arm to prevent him from posturing up.

Instead of wrapping both of my legs around Paco's waist and pulling full guard, I plant my left foot on his right hip.

I drive Paco's body over and to my right using my right De La Riva hook. As I do this, I push off his right hip with my left foot. Notice how these combined actions lift his right leg off the mat and starts turning his lower body over.

I successfully sweep Paco over to my right side, putting him on his back.

As Paco comes down to his back, I pull on his head with my left hand to help me up to my knees. Once there, I establish the top position.

I successfully sweep Paco over to my right side, putting him on his back.

As Paco comes down to his back, I pull on his head with my left hand to help me up to my knees. Once there, I establish the top position.

I've assumed the De La Riva guard position by wrapping my right leg all the way around Paco's left leg, hooking my right foot around his inner left thigh, placing my left foot on his left hip to maintain distance, and latching onto his left ankle with my right hand for control.

In an effort to close the distance and land an overhand right, Paco latches onto my left foot and tries to move it to his left side.

The instant Paco grabs a hold of my foot, I retract my left leg and bring my knee to the inside of my left elbow. This creates a barrier and prevents his overhand from landing. It is important to notice that I've held my left arm up to catch the punch early in its descent.

While Paco's weight is still moving forward with the punch, I place my left foot on his right hip, wrap my left arm around the back of his head to control his posture, and I draw my right leg into me. Because I have his left leg hooked with my right leg, it brings his weight forward even more.

overhand right counter to standing

If you attempt the previous sweep from the De La Riva guard position and your opponent counters by basing out on his O

far leg, you can use his compromised position to escape back to your feet as demonstrated below. r

Mixed Martial Arts

Mixed Martial Arts

Do You Want To Learn How To Protect Yourself? Have You Ever Thought About Learning The Art Of Self Defense? Discover The World Of MMA. The Complete Guide to Finally Understanding Mixed Martial Arts.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment