Q

When you execute the basic hip sweep and your opponent counters by wrapping his arms around your legs and driving you back down, you have the option of going for the omaplata. If your opponent is covered in Vaseline or both of you are soaked in sweat, the submission can sometimes be hard to lock in due to the slip factor, but you can often use the movement your submission attempt generated to claim the top position or escape back to your feet.

I post my left foot on the ground and elevate my hips. As I jam my left hip up into Troy's right armpit, I turn my body in a clockwise direction.

As I sit up, I post on my left hand, continue to scoot my hips out, and begin sliding my left leg underneath me. As I do this, I straighten my right leg to pin Troy's left shoulder to the mat.

Coiling my right leg in and my left leg back, I sit all the way up, wrap my right arm under Troy's right arm, wrap my left arm underneath his head, and grip my hands together. To finish the submission, I drive Troy's left shoulder down with my right leg and pull his forearm upward by elevating my hips.

Troy counters the sweep by wrapping his arms around my legs and driving his weight forward.

Posting on my right elbow, I drive my left arm into the left side of Troy's neck.

Although continuing with the sweep will be difficult, Troy has wrapped his arms around my legs, creating an opportunity for me to lock in the omaplata. As Troy tackles me forward, i swing my hips in a counterclockwise direction, roll to my back, and swing my right leg over his left arm.

I trap Troy's left arm against my right thigh using my right hand, and then I begin to pull my left leg out from underneath his body.

Continuing to drive my left arm into Troy's neck, I sit all the way up, unhook my feet, and post on my right hand.

posture up to arm bar

When you play the sit-up guard, you hinder your opponent's offensive options. In order to get something going, your opponent will often attempt to drive your body back to the mat with his hands. If you time it right, you can use his force against him by trapping his arm, rolling to your back, throwing your leg over his head, and securing an arm bar. Even i f you don't lock in the submission, your opponent will be forced to defend, and his movement will often create an opportunity for you to escape back to your feet or set up another submission.

Posting on my right elbow, I drive my left arm into the left side of Mark's neck.

Before I sit up and post on my right hand, Mark brings his arms to the inside of my body and begins to drive my body back to the mat.

Rather than resist Mark's downward pressure, I willingly fall to my back. As I do this, I hook my right hand around the inside of his left thigh. This hook will help me rotate my hips in a counterclockwise direction and get the angle I need to secure the arm bar.

Using my right hook on Mark's left leg, I pull my body in a counterclockwise direction. As I rotate, I start to maneuver my left leg around to the left side of Mark's head. It is important to notice how I am using my left arm to keep Mark's head at a distance, which helps me get my leg around.

I swing my left leg around to the left side of Mark's head.

I drop my left arm and pin Mark's right arm flat to my chest. To finish the arm bar, I apply downward pressure with both legs, squeeze my knees together, and extend my hips upward.

sit up guard to back

When you play the sit-up guard, your opponent's only real striking option is to punch or elbow you with his near arm. If he capitalizes on that option, a good tactic is to slip your head underneath the strike as it comes at you. As the downward momentum of your opponent's strike carries his body toward the mat, you hook the arm you have dug into his < neck around his shoulder. This gives you the leverage to pull yourself out from underneath his body and climb onto his ^ back. I'm not going to lie and say that it is an easy move to pull off, but it can certainly be accomplished.

Posting on my right elbow and driving my left arm into the side of Beach's face, I see him draw his left arm back to land an elbow strike to my face.

Using my hook on Beach's shoulder to drive his face into the mat, I post my right foot on the mat and scoot my hips out to my right side.

Posting on my right elbow and driving my left arm into the side of Beach's face, I see him draw his left arm back to land an elbow strike to my face.

Beach drives his left arm forward to land an elbow strike to my face. As I dodge the blow by ducking my head, I hook my left hand behind his left shoulder. The instant his elbow sails by my head, I force him to overcommit to the strike by using my hook on his shoulder to pull down on his body.

Using my hook on Beach's shoulder to drive his face into the mat, I post my right foot on the mat and scoot my hips out to my right side.

Continuing to pull down on Beach's shoulder and scoot my hips out, I push off my right leg and reach my right arm over Beach's back.

I hook my right hand on the side of Beach's body and throw my right leg over his back. To help climb on top of him, I push off my left arm. It is important to notice that as I throw my right leg over his back, I hook my left leg around the inside of his left leg, securing my first hook.

To establish my second hook and secure the back position, I sneak my right foot to the inside of Beach's right hip. It is important to notice how I lace my right arm underneath Beach's right arm. This helps prevent him from bucking me off.

Boxing Simplified

Boxing Simplified

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