Slipping the hook to body clinch

When your opponent throws a hook, his fist and shoulders move along a circular path rather than a linear path, which means you must avoid the strike differently than you would either a jab or cross. You have a couple of different options depending upon the situation. If you can spot the hook the instant your opponent begins to throw it, you can drop your elevation and shoot in for the double-leg takedown because his hips will still be squared up. However, as your opponent's fist and body progress along their circular trajectory, his hips become less square, making the double-leg takedown harder to accomplish. In such a scenario, a good approach is to drop into a crouched stance, let the punch sail over your head, and then step forward and establish a body-lock, which is the technique I show here. Once you've established a body-lock, you can work for the takedown or choose a number of other options. To learn those options, visit the "Clinch" section.

The momentum of Paco's punch carries his body in a clockwise direction, exposing his back. Immediately I explode off my right leg, step my left foot between his legs, and wrap both arms around his waist, securing a double under-hook body-lock.

Stepping my right foot to the outside of Paco's left leg, I dig my grip into the soft tissue just above his hip and below his ribs. From here you have several options, such as picking your opponent up and slamming him down. To review these options, visit the clinch section.

The momentum of Paco's punch carries his body in a clockwise direction, exposing his back. Immediately I explode off my right leg, step my left foot between his legs, and wrap both arms around his waist, securing a double under-hook body-lock.

Stepping my right foot to the outside of Paco's left leg, I dig my grip into the soft tissue just above his hip and below his ribs. From here you have several options, such as picking your opponent up and slamming him down. To review these options, visit the clinch section.

countering kick to takedown _

In this technique I'm countering my opponent's kick by shooting forward the instant I see him set his kick into motion. Timing is obviously crucial. The goal is to close the distance before the kick lands. If you can manage this, you will greatly reduce the impact of your opponent's kick and catch him on one leg, making the takedown effortless.

I'm in a standard fighting stance, squared off with Paco in the pocket.

I see Paco snap his hips in a counterclockwise direction to throw a right roundhouse kick. Immediately I begin to drop my level and shoot in.

With the power of the kick lost, I lock my hands together behind Paco's back—securing the double under-hooks—and step my right foot to the outside of his left leg.

As I step my left leg forward, Paco loses his balance and is forced to the ground.

I follow Paco to the mat, staying as tight to him as possible to prevent him from scrambling.

I see Paco snap his hips in a counterclockwise direction to throw a right roundhouse kick. Immediately I begin to drop my level and shoot in.

As I shoot in, I maneuver my head to Paco's right side and snatch up his kick with my left hand. Because I closed the distance so quickly and grabbed a hold of the kick, I not only smothered the impact of the blow, but I also caught Paco off balance, making the takedown significantly easier to manage.

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Boxing Simplified

Boxing Simplified

Devoted as I am to popularizing amateur boxing and to improving the caliber of this particularly desirable competitive sport, I am highly enthusiastic over John Walsh's boxing instruction book. No one in the United States today can equal John's record as an amateur boxer and a coach. He is highly regarded as a sportsman. Before turning to coaching and the practice of law John was one of the most successful college and Golden Gloves boxers the sport has ever known.

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