Straight Knees from Sprawl Control

This is another way you can land knee strikes from the front headlock position. In the previous technique I hoisted w my leg as high as I could and then came down with a devastating strike. In this technique, I'm pulling my knee back and coming straight in. It doesn't pack as much power, but it tends to have better speed and accuracy. Deciding which >

technique to use depends upon the situation. Your opponent will have one hand to defend your knee strikes, and if you're having a hard time landing knees from above, you can switch the trajectory of your knees and come straight in. r

Usually what ends up happening is you use a combination of both knee strikes. You might lift one leg up high, making your opponent think your knee will come barreling down, and then you execute a quick switch-step and throw your op- z posite knee straight in. It is important when throwing the straight knee that you don't simply power your leg forward;

you also want to use the front headlock to pull your opponent's head into your knee. It really helps beef up the power o behind your shots. You also want to make sure to keep your hips up because it allows you to maintain downward pres- f~

sure on your opponent and keep him pinned beneath you.

I secured the front headlock position on Albert. My left hand is cupped underneath his chin, my left arm is wrapped around the right side of his head, I'm up on my feet, my hips are held high, and I'm driving my weight down through my left shoulder and into Albert's back to keep him pinned to the mat.

I fake a right knee strike by lifting my right leg off the canvas.

As Albert prepares to defend against a right knee, I drop my right foot to the mat.

I secured the front headlock position on Albert. My left hand is cupped underneath his chin, my left arm is wrapped around the right side of his head, I'm up on my feet, my hips are held high, and I'm driving my weight down through my left shoulder and into Albert's back to keep him pinned to the mat.

The moment my right foot comes down, I throw my left leg straight back.

I fake a right knee strike by lifting my right leg off the canvas.

As my left knee strike nears Albert's head, I do two things at once. I lift his face by pulling up on his chin, which gives me a better target, and I pull his entire head into my knee to ensure he doesn't back out before the knee lands.

As Albert prepares to defend against a right knee, I drop my right foot to the mat.

With my left leg coiled tight, I crash my knee into Albert's head.

I quickly pull my left leg back to prevent Albert from latching onto it.

Boxing Simplified

Boxing Simplified

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