Striking to Americana

To execute this technique you first need to put yourself in a position to strike, and this can be managed by turning your hips toward your opponent's head and then walking your leg over his near arm to trap it to the mat. Once you achieve this, you can start dropping hammer fists and elbows to your opponent's unprotected face. He won't be able to defend the shots with his near arm as long as it's stuck to the mat, so he will most likely attempt to guard his face with his far arm. The moment he does this, it allows you to snatch up his far arm, pin it to the mat, and finish the fight with the Americana submission.

I'm in the modified side control with my back facing Paco's legs. My right elbow is pressed securely against his left hip and my legs are flared out to maintain my base. It is important to position your weight directly over your opponent to prevent him from scrambling.

I slide my left arm to the inside of Paco's right arm, and then I force his arm between my legs.

Holding Paco's right arm down with my left hand, I step my left leg over his arm.

I slide my left arm to the inside of Paco's right arm, and then I force his arm between my legs.

Holding Paco's right arm down with my left hand, I step my left leg over his arm.

I trap Paco's left arm by stepping my leg over the top of it and then coiling my leg back. Notice how this pinches his arm behind my left knee.

With Paco's right arm out of the picture, I lift my left arm to drop a hammer fist to his unprotected face.

I smash a hammer fist into Paco's nose,

As Paco maneuvers his left arm up to protect his face, I place my left hand on his wrist and begin forcing his arm to the mat.

I switch my base by flattening my hips out on the mat. This allows me to use my weight to pin Paco's left arm down on the top of my right arm.

I grip my left wrist with my right hand and then pull Paco's left arm tight to our bodies (this is a necessary step because it gives me the leverage to lock in the hold). To finish the submission, I press down on Paco's wrist with my left hand, and pull his elbow up with my right arm.

Striking to Kimura_

If your opponent is a good jiu-jitsu player and you trap him in the bottom side-control position, he will most likely make it very difficult for you to climb into the mount or land hard strikes. He'll have his near arm up to protect his head from knee strikes, and he'll have his far ami draped across his torso so he can push on your body and create separation. However, anytime your opponent has his arm draped across his body, he is giving you an opportunity to lock in a Kimura. To set up the submission, grab his wrist with your arm closest to his legs and then turn your hips so that your back is facing his head. The goal is to force his ami down to the mat, but if your opponent defends by grabbing onto his shorts or gripping the inside of his thigh, a good option is to land some hard elbows to the side of his unprotected head. As soon as your opponent loosens his grip, you can return to the Kimura and work to finish the submission. Constantly going back and forth between the Kimura and striking greatly increases your chances of finishing your opponent.

I'm in the side control position.

Latching onto Paco's left wrist with my right hand, I begin to switch my base by bringing my left leg underneath my right leg. This turns my hips toward Paco's legs.

Bringing my left leg all the way underneath my right leg so that my hips are facing Paco's legs, I scoop my left arm underneath his left arm to lock in the Kimura.

Latching onto Paco's left wrist with my right hand, I begin to switch my base by bringing my left leg underneath my right leg. This turns my hips toward Paco's legs.

I'm in the side control position.

Bringing my left leg all the way underneath my right leg so that my hips are facing Paco's legs, I scoop my left arm underneath his left arm to lock in the Kimura.

As I slide my left arm underneath Paco's left arm, his focus shifts to defending against the Kimura. I take the opportunity to jam my left elbow straight back into his face.

As I slide my left arm underneath Paco's left arm, his focus shifts to defending against the Kimura. I take the opportunity to jam my left elbow straight back into his face.

The instant I land the elbow, Paco's focus returns v to defending against my strikes. I use the oppor-| tunity to quickly slip my I left arm back underneath his left arm.

I latch onto my right wrist with my left hand. Then I switch my base back to standard side control by sliding my left leg underneath my right.

Still grabbing my right wrist with my left hand, I step my left leg over Paco's right arm and head.

Pushing off the mat with my left foot, I pull Paco off the ground using the Kimura lock. I then pull my left arm in and push my right hand to my left. By turning my arms in a counterclockwise direction, I finish the Kimura and put a great amount of pressure on Paco's left shoulder.

Boxing Simplified

Boxing Simplified

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