Turtle to back Sequence Countering Defense

This is the second back transition that you can utilize from the top turtle position. In the previous one, you established a hook on your opponent's near leg, rolled to your back, and then pulled your opponent on top of you so you could get your second hook and start working for a submission. In this sequence, you establish a hook on your opponent's near leg just as before, but then you throw your near leg over your opponent's back to establish your second hook. Once you've got both hooks established, you'll be perched on top of your opponent's back. Ideally you want to use your hooks to flatten your opponent belly-down on the mat to limit his offense, which 1 show how to do in the next sequence. However, in this sequence your opponent prevents you from flattening him out by quickly standing up. When this happens, utilizing this technique prevents your opponent from climbing all the way up to his feet and shaking you off his back. After nullifying your opponent's escape attempt, he will be forced to retreat back to his knees. From there, you can use your hooks to flatten him belly-down to the mat or pull him on top of you as you did in the previous technique.

I've secured the turtle position by distributing my weight over Reagan's lower back and wrapping my left arm around his body. Notice that there is little space between us. This provides optimal control.

To secure Reagan's back, I need to establish both of my hooks. I get my first hook by wedging my right leg to the inside of Reagan's right hip.

I establish my second hook by stepping my left leg over Reagan's back and wedging my left foot to the inside of his left hip.
Before I can establish the position and flatten Reagan out on the mat, he posts on his arms and begins climbing to his feet.

The moment Reagan posts on his right foot to stand up, I reach my left arm underneath his body and my right arm underneath his right leg. Gripping my hands together, I prevent him from standing up and shaking me off his back.

I've established back control by hooking both my feet to the inside of Tony's hips.

After securing both hooks, I drive my hips into the small of Tony's back and kick my legs back. This last action pushes Tony's legs out from underneath him and forces him belly-down on the mat.

flattening your opponent

When you utilize the previous technique to take your opponent's back from the top turtle position, flattening him belly-down on the mat should be your main priority. The instant you secure your second hook, you want to drive your weight into your opponent's lower back and sprawl your legs back to force him down to his belly. Once you achieve this, you can go to town with a barrage of punches to the side of his head or work to synch in the choke. When I fought Joey Gilbert early in my UFC career, I used this technique to flatten him out and then hammered away with punches. A few moments later, the referee put an end to the abuse by calling the fight.

After securing both hooks, I drive my hips into the small of Tony's back and kick my legs back. This last action pushes Tony's legs out from underneath him and forces him belly-down on the mat.

I've established back control by hooking both my feet to the inside of Tony's hips.

Continuing to drivi Tony's lower back

Continuing to drivi Tony's lower back hips into Tony's lower back and kick my legs back, I posture up. This applies even more downward pressure to flattens him out completely.

Remaining postured up, I drive my right hand into the right side of Tony's head and draw my left hand back for the follow up blow. A good tactic is to bat your opponent's head back and forth between your fists until the referee calls the fight.

As I extend my right leg back to land another knee, Reagan drops his right arm to protect his ribs.

By dropping his right arm to protect his ribs, Reagan has exposed his head. As I drive my right knee forward, I pull his head into the strike with my right hand. This not only helps me generate power, but it also prevents him from pulling his head away from the strike and lessening the blow.

Reagan is guarding his head with his right arm, leaving his right side exposed. To capitalize on the opening, I pull his head toward me with my right hand as I drive my right knee into his ribs.

kneeing the body and head from turtle

When you reach the top turtle position, your main goal should be to establish your hooks, take your opponent's back, and finish the fight. However, there are times when you might want to deviate from this primary route. If you know your opponent is completely gassed and has no energy left to escape the bottom turtle position, landing powerful knees to his body and head can break his will and possibly even cause the referee to stop the fight. Knee strikes also come in handy when your opponent balls up in the bottom turtle position and keeps his elbows pressed tightly against his legs to prevent you from establishing your first hook. By landing a knee high, you force him to lift his arm to defend his head, which in turn creates the space you need to secure your first hook and take his back.

Reagan is guarding his head with his right arm, leaving his right side exposed. To capitalize on the opening, I pull his head toward me with my right hand as I drive my right knee into his ribs.

As I extend my right leg back to land another knee, Reagan drops his right arm to protect his ribs.

By dropping his right arm to protect his ribs, Reagan has exposed his head. As I drive my right knee forward, I pull his head into the strike with my right hand. This not only helps me generate power, but it also prevents him from pulling his head away from the strike and lessening the blow.

I'm in the top turtle position on Reagan's right side. I've maneuvered my right hand to the left side of his head; this will give me the leverage I need to really drive my knee strikes forward.
I'm sitting up behind Beach with both hooks established. I have my right arm underneath his right arm, and I'm grabbing onto his right wrist with my right hand (you'll want to maintain this control throughout the duration of the move to prevent your opponent from blocking the choke).
Martial Arts An Introduction

Martial Arts An Introduction

Anytime an individual decides to learn how to protect themselves, learn self defense, or become a better person, one thing comes to mind - Martial Arts. Martial Arts are now being practiced all over the world.

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Responses

  • rowan t
    How to escape top turtle position with both legs hook in?
    5 years ago

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