Element Descriptions

Combat Fighter System Review

Street Fighting and Self Defense Guide

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These are the maneuver Elements:

Abort

The character can abort his next phase to perform this maneuver on a Segment not normally his Phase. (See "Aborting an Action" under "Beginning Combat" in the "Combat and Adventuring" section of the HERO System Rulesbook.) This adds +1 point to the cost of the maneuver. Important Note: You can never Abort to any maneuver that does damage or is in any way aggressive, which includes any maneuver with the Disarm or Throw Elements. Therefore, Abort may only be built into Blocks, Dodges and Escapes (an Escape is an Exert maneuver where the STR bonus is only usable for getting out of an enemy's Grab).

Bind

This maneuver Element can only be used against a weapon. If successful, it "binds" the weapon, pushing it away or locking it into position somehow so that its wielder cannot use it. The character using the maneuver does not suffer any damage from grabbing or touching the weapon (if that is how the maneuver is defined).

Bind is an Exclusive Basis, so a maneuver with Bind may not also have any of the following Elements: Block, Disarm, Dodge, Strike.

This Element adds +1 point to the cost of the maneuver.

Block

This maneuver is based on the normal Block, granting basic modifiers +0 to OCV and +0 to DCV. As with the normal Block, it keeps attacks from hitting the target, sets up the defender to strike first on the next Phase (assuming they both act in the same Phase) and comes with a free Abort option.

A Block requires the character doing the blocking to compare his OCV to the opponent's OCV, rather than to his DCV. Once a character has decided to Block, he can block multiple attacks in a single Phase. (See "Block" in the HERO System Rulesbook.) The Block Element adds +0 points to the cost of the maneuver.

Block is an Exclusive Basis, so a maneuver with the Block Element may not have any of the following Elements: Bind, Disarm, Dodge, Flash, Grab Weapon, Strike.

This is a penalty to the attacker's DCV. It is used to represent maneuvers which tend to expose the attacker to counterattack. The maximum penalty you can take on a maneuver is -2 DCV.

A character may not have both DCV - penalties and DCV + bonuses on the same maneuver.

This is a bonus to the attacker's DCV. It is used to represent maneuvers which are so fast, graceful or unpredictable that they make the attacker more difficult to counterattack. The maximum bonus you can take on a maneuver is +3 DCV.

A character may not have both DCV + bonuses and DCV -penalties on the same maneuver.

Disable

This Element signifies a maneuver which is intended to disable or cripple a particular limb. Joint-breaks and other maneuvers which are used to attack specific limbs should be built with this Element. It adds +0 to the cost of the maneuver because it grants as many restrictions as it does benefits.

Maneuvers with the Disable Element do not suffer Hit Location penalties. For example, a Killing Strike defined as a knee-breaking low kick built with this Element would not be at -7 OCV. Attacks built with this element determine damage using the usual method described in the Hit Location rules. However, for purposes of determining if the attack was Impairing or Disabling, the BODY done by the attack is doubled.

Example: "Bull"Robinson tries his knee-breaking kick (a Killing Strike with a Disable element) on his opponent. The attack hits, and Bull rolls 6 BODY for damage to the victim's right leg. The victim therefore takes 12 STUN and 3 BODY. Since the victim has 10 BODY, this attack would normallybe considered Impairing (since 6 BODY is more than half of 10). However, since this an attack with a Disable element, the amount of BODY rolled is doubled to determine Impairing or Disabling effects. Thus, the 6 BODY is doubled to 12 BODY, and the attack is considered Disabling, which means that the leg is broken. The victim has taken 12 STUN and 3 BODY, but he has a broken leg and cannot walk.

Refer to the HERO System rules under Optional Effects of Damage for more information about Impairing and Disabling rules. One addition to the Disabling effects tables: a broken limb is considered useless. A character with a broken leg may no longer walk, but can crawl at 1" per phase. Broken limbs take approximately two months to heal under normal circumstances.

The limb targeted by a Disable-based attack generally does not need to be chosen in advance. However, GMs should remember that attacks which "Disable" the Head do not affect the victim's intelligence or his ability to move the rest of his body, they just prevent him from using his head as a weapon.

The drawback to using the Disable Element is that the attack is limited to use only on limbs. It cannot be used to do generalized killing damage, nor can it be used against non-limb-like objects. At the GM's discretion, characters might be allowed to define a single specific non-limb target (say, the Chest) for use with the Disable Element if the maneuver can be used only against that Hit Location and no other. Also at the GM's option, a Disable maneuver could be used against limb-like objects, such as tree branches.

Refer to the discussion of Grab maneuvers in the "Combat Maneuvers" section of this book for more information on limbs.

Disarm

A character who successfully performs a Disarm can try to knock a weapon or other hand-held device from his opponent's grasp.

Both characters make STR Rolls, counting only BODY. If the defender rolls more BODY, he holds onto his weapon. If the attacker rolls more BODY or the rolls are tied, the weapon goes flying /d6 hexes in the direction of the strike (which is the player's choice, subject to GM approval). (See "Disarm" in the HERO System Rulesbook.) This Element adds +2 points to the cost of the maneuver.

Note: Additional damage bought for the Disarm goes to increasing the character's Disarm strength, not to doing damage to the target; a Disarm never does damage to the target.

Disarm is an Exclusive Basis, so a maneuver with the Disarm Element may not have any of the other following Elements: Bind, Block, Dodge, Flash, Grab Weapon, Strike.

Dodge

This means that the maneuver is based on the Dodge maneuver instead of the Strike maneuver. The character starts out with no OCV (this maneuver can't do damage), +3 DCV and can abort to the maneuver. This costs +0 points because it grants as many restrictions as advantages.

Additional DCV bought with the Dodge starts out costing 2 points per +1 DCV. You may not buy a Dodge maneuver with more than an additional +2 DCV (for a possible total of +5 DCV). Important Note: You cannot "buy down" the OCV of a Dodge maneuver (in other words, you can't take the OCV - Element on it to reduce its cost).

Dodge is an Exclusive Basis, so a maneuver with the Dodge Element cannot have any of the other following Elements: Bind, Block, Disarm, Flash, Grab Weapon, Strike.

Fall

You automatically fall down, in the hex where you performed the attack. This Element subtracts 1 point from the cost of the maneuver.

In maneuver listings, this Element is normally indicated by use of the phrase "You Fall."

Flash

This Exclusive Basis is used to disrupt and temporarily "blind" one or more ofthe target's Sense Groups. This is best visualized as the attacker jabbing his opponent in the eyes, hitting his ears to deafen him, using special nerve group attacks to numb his sense of touch and so forth.

The Flash Basis costs + 1 point per /d6 of Flash up to 1d6, and +2 points per +/d6 thereafter, to a maximum of 2d6 Flash. The basic attack affects one Sense Group; additional Sense Groups may be purchased for +1 point. However, the GM should be wary of Flash maneuvers which affect more than one Sense Group and allow them only when they are balanced.

In most cases, the appropriate form of Flash Defense should protect a character against a maneuver with the Flash Basis. However, there may be some exceptions, which the GM would have to adjudicate on a case-by-case basis. For example, a character whose Sight Flash Defense is based on the fact that he has light-based powers and is used to bright lights is not going to have much defense against a Martial Flash defined as poking him in the eyes.

The GM should also remember that there are many things which would prevent a martial Flash attack from working, given its nature. For example, a helmeted character usually will be protected from Sight and Hearing Group Flashes, since it is impossible for the martial artist to reach his eyes and ears to affect them.

Extra DCs add to the Flash Basis the same way they do to the NND DMG Element—each +1 Extra DC adds +/d6 to the Flash attack.

In maneuver listings, this Basis is normally indicated by use of the phrase, "_ Sense Group

Flash."

Flash is an Exclusive Basis, so a maneuver with the Flash Element cannot have any of the other following Elements. Bind, Block, Disarm, Dodge, Grab Weapon, Strike.

FMove

This maneuver may be performed during or at the end of a full move instead of just a half-move. (This does not mean it is a 0-Phase maneuver. If performed after a half-move or no move at all, it counts as a half-move action.)

For example, combining "FMove" with "Fall," "Throw," and "v/5" results in a flying tackle that can be performed at the end of a full run.

Attacks built with this Element do not automatically have to take place at the very end of a character's move. For example, an attack defined as a Strike made while the character moves past someone (a "Martial Move By," if you will) could take place at any point during the character's move. However, the GM should treat this aspect of the FMove Element carefully and not allow players to abuse it; most attacks with the FMove Element should still take place at or near the end of the attacker's full move. If used indiscriminately, the FMove Element can make some characters "un-attackable," which unbalances the game.

Example: Nakada Shigeru is a samurai who knows the art of Kenjutsu. He is engaged in a duel with another samurai and wishes to use his Running Stroke maneuver (a Passing Strike). His opponent stands 5" away from him; Nakada-san has 9" of Running. His FMove-based attack takes place 5" into his full move of 9", so that when the attack is over he is 4" beyond his opponent.

If Nakada-san had been significantly closer to his foe (say, 2-3" distance), the GM might consider forbidding the use of the Running Stroke, since it could unfairly place Nakada-san out ofthe range of a counterattack (i.e., the attack, if used repeatedly in such situations, could affect game balance, so the GM disallows it).

You cannot take this Element on a maneuver that already has the Time + Element.

This Element adds +3 points to the cost of the maneuver.

Follow

This means that the maneuver must follow some other specific successful maneuver; that maneuver must be defined when the martial arts style is created. An example would be a maneuver which grants a bonus to Crushing STR; this maneuver may only be performed on the Phase following a successful Grab.

Both attacks may not occur on the same Phase; the required attack takes place on one Phase, and the following maneuver on the next.

Since the Following maneuver does take place on the next Phase, a new OCV to-hit roll must be made; visualize this as the attacker having to change grips to accomplish the maneuver. This is the case even when the maneuver is Following itself. With maneuvers following Grabs, the victim will be at a / DCV. (At the GM's option, the Following attack could occur without requiring that a new OCV to-hit roll be made, but this should be rare.)

A Following maneuver may also Follow itself; for example, a Crush may follow a Grab or a previous Crush. For a Following maneuver to succeed, at least one of the maneuvers it Follows must have been successfully performed or maintained on the previous Phase.

Example: Smash Adams, a SPD 3 pro wrestler, has a Crush maneuver, which must follow a Grab. On Phase 4, he successfully Grabs The Towering Titan. On Phase 8, he may use the Crush maneuver, since it follows Grab, but he must roll to hit against Titan's new, reduced DCV. If he misses, the Crush doesn't work, but he maintains the Grab on Titan. Whether he hits or he misses, on Phase 12 he may use the Crush maneuver again, since it can follow itself, but again he must roll to hit. This Element subtracts 2 points from the cost of the maneuver.

In maneuver listings, this Element is normally indicated by use of the phrase "Must Follow (Name of Maneuver)."

For information on the effects of using the "Trigger" or "Continuous" Advantages in conjunction with this Element, refer to the "power Advantages For Martial Arts Maneuvers" and "Character Creation" sections of this book.

Grab Opponent

This Element allows the character to get a hold on his opponent. The maneuver could be defined as a simple hold placed on the enemy, as an elaborate joint-lock, or anything similar.

The basic Grab Element allows the character to Grab two limbs. Each additional limb costs +1 point. Most joint-lock maneuvers will only Grab 1-2 limbs; pins and full body holds may incapacitate 4 or 5 limbs, thus preventing the character from moving or attacking at all. Of course, multiple Grabs can be used on a single character to successively pinion all of his limbs—it just takes a few Phases and several successful to-hit rolls.

The Grabbing character may, in the same phase as a successful Grab is executed, apply STR damage to his opponent (crushing or strangling him) or may throw or bear his opponent to the ground (for normal STR damage or no damage at all, as the player prefers).

This Element adds +3 points to the cost of the maneuver.

Additional damage for this maneuver may be bought as N-Damage (for crushing or strangling), as additional STR for holding on to a struggling target or as both; such a maneuver could have +2d6 damage, costing 2 points and +10 STR for holding on, costing 2 more points.

For more information on Grabbing and its effects on combat, refer to the "Combat Maneuvers" section of this book.

Grab Weapon

This maneuver allows the character to get a hold on his enemy's weapon (or other item carried in hand).

The Grabbing character may, in the same phase as a successful Grab is executed, make a STR vs. STR Roll against the target; if he wins, he wrests the held item away from his foe. (If the target wins, the target wrests it out of the character's grasp, and if the roll is a tie, neither can pull it away from the other.)

This Element adds +3 points to the cost of the maneuver.

Additional damage for this maneuver is bought as additional STR for wresting the weapon away.

Half-Move Required

This Restrictive Element is taken for any maneuver which by its nature requires the character to make

a half-move, usually to "build up momentum." If the character is unable to make a half-move, the maneuver cannot be used (or, at the GM's discretion, will only cause greatly reduced damage). This Element is similar to the "Gestures" Limitation, because a maneuver that takes it can only be used if the character can move freely and is not confined or restrained. Flying kicks and similar maneuvers may have this restriction.

Half-Move Required cannot be taken for any maneuver which has the FMove Element.

At the GM's option, the definition ofwhat amounts to a "half move" can be expanded to cover any sort of requirement that a character make a particular movement or have a particular amount of space available to him before he can perform a maneuver. For example, a character could have a maneuver that could only be performed if he had at least 1" of open space around him on all sides—this can be simulated with the Half-Move Required Element. Similarly, if the maneuver required the character to make some specific motion, such as a cartwheel, before he used the maneuver, this could also be simulated with this Restrictive Element. In any event, this Element can only be taken once for a maneuver.

K-Damage

This stands for Killing Damage. If the maneuver does Killing Damage instead of Normal Damage, additional damage costs +3 points per +1 DC, up to a maximum of +4 DC.

The character's STR also adds to the maneuver's damage, at + 1 DC per 5 points of STR, but this added damage may not more than double the purchased damage for the maneuver. (For example, if a maneuver does +2 DC of K-Damage, and the character with the maneuver has STR 15, he would be able to add +3 DC to the maneuver. except that this more than doubles the purchased damage of the maneuver. He can only add +2 DC to the maneuver, for a total of 4 DC, or 1d6+1 K.)

Important Note: You may not mix damage types in a single maneuver. A maneuver may have only one of the following three types of damage bonus: K-Damage, N-Damage, orNND DMG. A maneuver may have both K-Damage and v/5, where each 5" of relative movement translates into +1 DC of added K-Damage (HERO System Rulesbook).

Lasting Restriction

This Restrictive Element can only be taken on a maneuver that has at least -1 worth of penalties to OCV or DCV. It signifies that the CV penalty lasts for one additional Phase beyond when it would normally disappear. It does not matter for purposes of this Element what maneuver is used in that additional Phase, the penalty will still remain.

Example: Chang wants to build a Sacrifice Strikelike maneuver that will simulate an all-out attack which he has a difficult time recovering from. He takes the Lasting Restriction Element on his Sacrifice Strike maneuver, reducing its costs to 4 points but subjecting himself to the -2 DCV penalty for an extra Phase.

Chang, SPD 6, gets into a fight with Jeung, SPD 5. Chang decides to try to finish Jeung off quickly and uses his Sacrifice Strike in Phase 2. Unfortunately, Chang misses. Jeung also misses in Phase 3. In Phase 4, Chang can act again. Normally, the -2 DCV penalty from the Offensive Strike would no longer apply, since it is a new Phase, but because he took the Lasting Restriction Element on his maneuver, he will start at a base -2 DCV in Phase 4, regardless of what attack he uses. Lasting Restriction penalties do not accumulate if maneuvers with the Element are used in succession. Thus, in the example above, if Chang had used his Sacrifice Strike again in Phase 4, he would be at -4 DCV (-2 from Phase 2, and another -2 for the maneuver he is using in Phase 4). Then, in Phase 6, he would start off with a base -2 DCV penalty because he used a maneuver with a Lasting Restriction in Phase 4— not a base -4 DCV.

Lasting Restriction subtracts one point from the cost of the maneuver. It is most appropriate for maneuvers with DCV penalties, but can also be used for maneuvers with OCV penalties as well.

N-Damage

This stands for Normal Damage, and adds damage dice to the STR used with the maneuver.

It costs +1 point per +1d6 normal damage up to +2d6, then costs +2 points per additional + 1d6 up to the maximum of+4d6 (therefore +4d6 would cost 6 points).

Important Note. You may not mix damage types in a single maneuver. A maneuver may have only one of the following three types of damage bonus. K-Dam-age, N-Damage or NND DMG. A maneuver may have both N-Damage and v/5, where each 5" of relative movement translates into +1d6 added N-Damage.

NND DMG

This stands for No Normal Defense Damage (see the description of the "No Normal Defense" Power Advantage from the "Power Advantages" section of the HERO System Rulesbook).

Each +1 point spent gives the maneuver +^d6 NND, up to 1d6; each +^d6 thereafter costs +2 points, up to its maximum of 2d6 NND. The character's STR does not add damage to this maneuver, so NND DMG maneuvers must take the STR -Element at the No STR level (for -2 pts).

As with any separately-purchased No Normal Defense attack, this maneuver must have a reasonably common defense, such as Life Support (doesn't need to breathe) for a choking attack or Armor for nerve strikes. Refer to the discussion of Nerve Strikes in the "Combat Maneuvers" section of this book for a list of suggested defenses. Important Note: You may not mix damage types in a single maneuver. A maneuver may have only one of the following three types of damage bonus: K-Damage, N-Damage_or NND DMG. A maneuver may have both NND DMG and v/5, where each 5" ofrelative movement translates into +^d6 NND DMG. As usual, the added damage cannot more than double the base damage; if the maneuver normally does 2d6 NND, then extra damage from a +v/5 Element cannot boost the maneuver up to more than 4d6 NND, no matter how fast the characters are going.

This is a penalty to the attacker's OCV. It is used to represent maneuvers which are awkward and less accurate than ordinary attacks. The maximum penalty you can take on a maneuver is -2 OCV.

This Element subtracts 1 point from the maneuver per -1 OCV taken to the maneuver.

A character may not have both OCV - penalties and OCV + bonuses on the same maneuver.

This is a bonus to the attacker's OCV. It is used to represent maneuvers which are so fast, powerful, or unpredictable that the defender is less able to anticipate them or defend against them. The maximum bonus you can take on a maneuver is +2 OCV.

This Element costs +1 point to the maneuver per + 1 OCV taken to the maneuver.

A character may not have both OCV + bonuses and OCV -penalties on the same maneuver.

One Limb

This Restrictive Element is applied to Grab maneuvers which only immobilize one limb. Many joint-locks and similar maneuvers will take this restriction.

This Element subtracts 1 point from the cost of a Grab.

Response

This Restrictive Element is applied to maneuvers which can only follow a specific maneuver used by one's opponent. The attacker's maneuver can be defined in fairly general terms (such as "a punch," "a kick" or "a Nerve Strike"), but cannot simply be defined as "an offensive maneuver." The maneuver does not need to be defined in strict game terms; however the specified type of attack must be plainly spelled out. The GM has final say-so over whether the attacker's maneuver has been defined properly; the more specific or detailed a definition, the better.

This Element subtracts 3 points from the cost of a maneuver. In maneuver descriptions this Element is indicated by the words "Can Only Be Used After X," where X is the attacker's maneuver.

The character using this maneuver cannot use some or all of his STR with the maneuver.

This Element subtracts 1 point if he can only use half his STR with the maneuver, or 2 points if he can use none of his STR with the maneuver.

A character may not have both STR - penalties and STR + bonuses on the same maneuver.

A character may add to his STR for this maneuver. This Element costs 1 point per +5 STR up to +10 STR, then it costs +2 pts per additional +5 STR up to the maximum of +20 STR.

Important Note: This STR must be defined as being for one purpose only. For example, it may be Only For Holding On With Grab, Only For Shoving, Only For Escaping Grab, Only To Resist Shoving and so forth.

A Grab maneuver may have both an N-Damage bonus and a STR + bonus; the N-Damage would augment the STR damage done if the character decides to apply STR to hurt the victim, while the STR + bonus would improve his chances to hold onto the victim. At the GM's option, a character may also have an NND-Damage bonus and a STR + bonus, where the STR adds only to the Grab Element; ordinarily, this would not be allowed, since NND-Damage maneuvers take the STR - Element at the 0 STR level. If the GM allows a character to purchase such a maneuver, the character cannot take that Restrictive Element, but the maneuver's STR + bonus still does not add to his NND-Damage.

A character may not have both STR + bonuses and STR - penalties on the same maneuver.

Strike

This maneuver normally does damage to the target. It starts out with +0 OCV, +0 DCV, takes a halfPhase to land and does the character's normal STR damage to the target. Even if the maneuver is built in such a way that it does no damage to its target, it counts as an attack (i.e., the character cannot follow it with another action in the same Phase).

It's possible to add the STR - Element to the maneuver so that it does little or no damage, which is especially appropriate with Throw maneuvers which do no harm to the target.

The Strike Basis is an Exclusive Basis, so a Strike maneuver may have none of the following bases in it: Bind, Block, Disarm, Dodge, Flash, Grab Weapon.

Take Full DMG

The character takes full damage from the maneuver. This is especially appropriate for collision-based maneuvers. For example, a STR 15 character performing a STR +3d6 Tackle with the Take Full DMG Element on it would do 6d6 damage to his victim and would also sustain 6d6 damage when he successfully performed the maneuver.

With NND and K-Damage attacks, the character takes an equivalent DC of normal physical damage: If the attack does 2d6 K (6 DC), the character sustains 6d6 normal physical damage, and if the attack does 2d6 NND (4 DC), the character sustains 4d6 normal physical damage.

This Element subtracts 2 points from the cost of the maneuver.

Take Half Damage

This Element is exactly like the "Takes Full DMG" Element, except that the character performing the maneuver only takes half damage, not full damage. It subtracts 1 point from the cost of the maneuver.

Throw

Important Note: Some elements of the Throw maneuver have been changed. Please read the following paragraphs with care. Successful use of a maneuver with this Non-Exclusive Basis throws the opponent to the ground; in maneuver listings, this is indicated with use of the words "Target Falls," "He Falls" or "Opponent Falls," instead of "Throw." Throws are typically bought as Strikes, so that the target takes the attacker's STR damage from being bounced off the ground.

Throws have an additional effect—they allow the character who makes the Throw to attack the Thrown character first in their next Phase regardless of relative DEX (if they both have the same Phase as their next move), similar to a Block. This represents the disadvantageous position that the Thrown character is in (either because he is on the ground, or because he has had to do something to get back on his feet). At the GM's option, the Thrown character can avoid this effect if he makes a Breakfall roll by half (a straight DEX Roll may be substituted, if the GM prefers).

This Element adds +1 point to the cost of the maneuver.

Refer to the "Combat Maneuvers" section of this book for more information on Throws and their effects.

Important Note: The Throw Element and the Martial Throw maneuver do not automatically Block incoming simultaneous attacks. See the "Combat Maneuvers" section for an explanation of the relationship between Throws and simultaneous attacks.

This maneuver takes extra time to perform. This Element is especially appropriate for maneuvers where the attacker must prepare himself for a second or two before launching the attack. You cannot move in the Phase you perform this attack. This is best used to simulate maneuvers where you have to stand in one place to summon a lot of power into a strike, and is sometimes taken with the DCV - Element.

This Element subtracts 1 point from the maneuver cost if the attack does not land until the bottom of the next segment.

You cannot put this Element on a maneuver that already has the "FMove" or "Half-Move Required" Elements.

In maneuver listings, this Element is indicated in the Phase column of the chart, where "1+" is listed instead of "V2."

Unbalancing

This Restrictive Element is taken for maneuvers which tend to throw the user off-balance. Because of this, the user will strike last on his next phase. The user moves after everyone else who moves on that phase. If more than one character is using a maneuver with the Unbalancing element in the same phase, they move in DEX order, or as otherwise determined by the GM.

This Element subtracts one point from the cost of a maneuver.

A maneuver with this Element gets a damage bonus based on the relative velocity of the two combatants. The maneuver does +(v/5)d6 normal damage, where "v" is the relative velocity.

For example, if two attackers are rushing together at 8" each, their relative velocity is 16"; the attack gets +3d6 normal damage. If one is running toward the other at 6", the relative velocity is 6" and the attack gets +1d6 normal damage. Even if a character is only making a half-move, his velocity is counted as if it is his full running speed, because characters can accelerate to their full running speed with a half-move. Therefore, if a character has 8" of running and makes a 4" half-move, you count his velocity as 8".

GMs may alter this rule if they feel it makes the v/

5 Element too powerful. For example, it would be possible to distinguish the effects of v/5 based on the type of maneuver: if the maneuver uses the attacker's impact to injure the target (such as Flying Tackle), velocities should add together in the same way that vehicle collision velocities do (refer to the "Vehicle Combat" section of An Eye For An Eye for more information); if the maneuver involves using the target's own momentum against him (such as Martial Throw), then only the target's velocity would matter.

This Element adds + 1 point to the cost of a maneuver. It may only be bought once.

Important Note: v/5 may also be added to NND DMG and K-Damage attacks. Itadds +1 DC (^d6 NND or +1 DC killing damage) per 5" of velocity to those maneuvers (HERO System Rulesbook).

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Martial Arts An Introduction

Martial Arts An Introduction

Anytime an individual decides to learn how to protect themselves, learn self defense, or become a better person, one thing comes to mind - Martial Arts. Martial Arts are now being practiced all over the world.

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