For in truth there are no transitions In Ba Gua the whole system is the embodiment of transition

The seamless continuity of Ba Gua both in application and progression lead the student to a deeper understanding of the nature of change, whispering a deeper realization that Ba Gua is never a rigid or fragmentary art. The forms are only sentences passed down from one master to the next. It is the obligation of the practitioner to become proficient enough to be able to make his or her own poetry. This is achieved by breaking down and understanding the individual components or motion characteristics of the fundamental forms, and then syncretizing them eventually embodying the art. When the student can do this, he or she becomes one with change, and has passed through the presented "doorway."

However lets not mistake the creative with the practical, this poetry must conform to the inherent principles and practical usage, otherwise it's not Ba Gua Zhang!

I would like to express my deepest gratitude to Leung Kay Chi, Adam Hsu & Daniel Farber for their kindness.

Glen Gurman (also known by his Taoist name, Bai Guang Tao) started his martial arts at age 17, in the art of Isshinryu Karate. He was taught by a senior student of karate's living legend Don Nagle. After earning his black belt he was exposed to the fascinating art of Ba Gua by a senior student of Bo Sim Mark. Greatly inspired by this mysterious Kung Fu he began his study of this system. It was during this time that he met Leung Kay Chi, disciple of Ba Gua great Liu Yun Chiao. For many years he took weekly private lessons and was the only student to do so. During this time he was also required to learn Northern Shaolin, Chen and Yang family Tai chi. Specializing in Ba Gua he has spent a great deal of time in its practice and research. Desiring to learn as deeply as possible, he began another study with Daniel Farber senior Ba Gua student of Adam Hsu who is also a disciple of Liu. Gurman is a full time Physician of Traditional Chinese Medicine as well as an American herbalist. He is the advisorfor Oriental Medicine in the state of Vermont and teaches at the Dartmouth medical school, on 27 Oriental Medicine. He is available for the occasional seminar.

Using Bai Bu to Trap, As the Opponent Retreats, Beginning to Sieze the

Opening the Side Door Controlling the Arm, Strik- Root & Trap the Legs ing the Kidney & Root

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The First Change of the Large Saber Form

Photo 1 - Note that the Saber is hidden

Photo 2 - Wrapping ther Body Toe-in to the Inside

Photo 3 - Pivoting Counter-clockwise continuing to Wrap

Apround the Body

Photo 4 - Facing Outside the Circle

Photo 5 - Turning Clockwise bacvk to the Inside of the Circle

Photo 6 - Step Up to Cut

Photo 7 - Cutting

Photo 8 - Hiding the Saber

Photo 8

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