Chang Chun Fengs wife Hsu Pao Mei in 1992

In taking that one package of medicine she says, "He lost half his life."

The day after Chang had mentioned his condition to his old friend, the friend showed up with a pack of powdered medicine. Chang took the medicine at once and that night in class became too ill to teach. He asked his wife to teach the class and he went to lay down to get some rest. After his wife finished teaching the class she went to check up on him. He had vomited and looked very sick. He told her that he wanted something cold to eat. His stomach felt like it was on fire.

The next day was Sunday and Chang's wife took him to the hospital. His skin was discolored and he looked very sick, however, the hospital was short handed that day and the doctors and nurses would not pay attention to him. Chang's wife got upset and called one of Chang's students who worked in the Presidential Building, and therefore could pull some strings. She asked him to call the hospital and tell the chief medical officer on duty to look into Chang's condition quickly. After the phone call Chang was cared for properly. Chang was given a blood transfusion and was fed intravenously for several days before he got better.

The doctors could never find what the problem was exactly, however, his wife reports that for the next seven years of his life he was treated periodically for complications resulting from this incident. Although Chang got better, he never fully recovered. After this incident, his wife taught most of the martial arts classes. He would give her detailed instruction in a morning practice session and she would teach the group classes in Pa Kua, Hsing-I, and T'ai Chi. While Chang would attend the classes and make corrections, his wife did most of the physical work in teaching the classes during the last seven years of his life. Chang would usually sit in a chair and yell out corrections to the students.

Three days before Chang died, he told his wife that he only had three days left to live. He called each of his children in to talk with them. He told two of them to continue his work and three others to help in the administration. He told the five eldest to take care of their mother and the younger children. On the third day his wife was with some students and they heard a loud sound of exhalation come from Chang's room. She immediately phoned the doctor at the Presidential Building to come and try to save him. The doctor came, however there was nothing he could do. Chang Chun-Feng died on the 16th day of the 5th lunar month in 1974. On the day Chang was buried there were more than 3000 people in attendance, many were high ranking government officials.

Chang's Wife Continues his Teaching

After Chang Chun-Feng died, his wife continued to hold classes and teach the Hsing-I, Pa Kua, and T'ai Chi. She carried on with the same classes that she taught when Chang was alive. During the last six or seven years of Chang's life she led all of the classes and Chang acted as the disciplinarian and functioned as quality control. After he passed away she became much stricter in her teaching because she had to prove that she could do it without her husband. Today Hsu Pao-Mei is still teaching, however, she prefers to only teach the T'ai Chi.

Footnotes

1) Readers interested in finding out more about Kao's Pa Kua Chang should refer to Pa Kua Chang Newsletter Vol. 2, No.3 and Pa Kua Chang Journal, Vol. 3, No. 2. In Vol. 2, No. 3 the reader will also find information about the Pa Kua taught by He K'o-Ts'ai and Yu I-Hsien. Future issues of the Journal will address Kao's Pa Kua Chang as taught by Wu Meng-Hsia, Li Chuang-Fei, and Liu Feng-Ts'ai.

2) Although some reports state that Chang Chun-Feng was born as early as 1894, the most accurate date given was 1902, 4th day of the 12th lunar month.

3) I Kuan means consistent or unwavering, Tao means the way or path. I Kuan Tao is more a philosophy than a religion. The followers of I Kuan Tao believe in all five of the major religions or philosphies which are prominent

Kuan Tao Taiwan

The name of Chang's school is still above the door to the entrance to Chang's home on Hsin-I Road in China. They view Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Islam, and Christianity, as differing expressions of the same universal and unwavering Tao.

4) It is very interesting to note that Chang referred to his Ch'i Kung method as Lung Men. As we reported in the last issue of the Pa Kua Chang Journal, the circle walking method taught to Tung Hai-Ch'uan originated with the Lung Men sect of Taoism. Tung Hai-Ch'uan did not teach his full system of Taoist Ch'i Kung to many of his Pa Kua Chang students. The only one who is known to have received this full transmission was Yin Fu. Since Chang Chun-Feng learned his Ch'i Kung from Yin's student, he likely received Tung's direct Taoist Ch'i Kung transmission. There are very few, if any, Pa Kua Chang practitioners outside of the Yin Fu lineage who received this training.

Sitting on the hardened steamed bun was most likely a method used to close off the anus when practicing the ch'i kung method.

5) Many families of Chang T'ing-Hua's Pa Kua Chang call their style Yu Shen Lien Huan Pa Kua Chang. There are at least 4 or 5 books on Pa Kua published in mainland China by practitioners in Ch'eng T'ing-Hua's lineage which bear this same name.

Chinese Character Index

Kao I-Sheng Yin Fu i=f Liang Chen-P'u

^ Chang Chao-Tung

pfe Fu Chen-Sung

Sun Lu-T'ang Wu Meng-Hsia He K'o Ts'ai Yu I-Hsien Chang Chun-Feng Hao Wei-Chen I Kuan Tao Chang Hsiang-Chin Wu Ta-T'iao Chou Ch'ing-Shun Hung I-Wen Hung I-Hsiang it n m *

m eg

Jlf m

Hung I-Mien Hsu I-Fei Huang A-Ho Han Ch'ing-T'ang Hsu Pao-Mei Wang Shu-Chin T'ien Kan Hsien T'ien Hou T'ien P'i Ch'uan San Shou Fa Ching

Lung Men Ch'i Kung Tung Hai-Ch'uan Tan T'ien Chou T'ien Shu Liu Feng-Ts'ai Ts'ai Wan-Cheng Tu Shao-T'ang Liu Shu-Hang Wang Shu-Sheng Chiang Jung-Ch'iao Li Ying-Ang im f

Yu Shen Pa Kua Lien Huan Chang

Wan Jung Cheng
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