Advanced Techniques

Throwing the blade in Negishi Ryu Adjusting to distance When adjusting to the variation in distance while throwing in the Negishi Ryu, one cannot make the same simple adjustments possible in Shirai Ryu, where one just needs to turn the blade in the hand. In Negishi Ryu, the hand grip is constant. To make the adjustment to different distances, slight postural changes need to be made, both in the way the hand is held, and the leaning of the body at throw. 1. Leaning the body When close to a...

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The turning hit method Figure 21. The turning hit method The third way a blade turns, the multi turn method, or dakaiten-da, has the blade turning 360 deg. or more as it flies through the air. This method is employed by the hira shuriken schools, where the many points of the star shaped blade will rotate and have no difficulty piercing the target at any distance. This method is also employed by the Shirai Ryu over long distance throws, up to 18 steps . Not illustrated. Distance from...

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Saito Morihiro Negishi Ryu

Throwing the blade during a sword cut There are also techniques that involve throwing shuriken while holding a sword. Because the throwing position of the right hand, and the throwing action of the right hand is the same as the position and action of the right hand as it holds and cuts with a sword, the two weapons can be blended in such a way that they do not adversely affect the movement of each other. There are 5 forms in a kata called Tojustsu Kumikomi no Kata, see fig. 37 where the sword...

Aikido Hand Movements

Saito Sensei Negishi Ryu

The third level of Koso no I see fig. 25 is called chokushi no kata, which involves a further shortening of the form. The holding of the right arm by the side is subtracted, making the movement go directly from passing the blade step 3 to shuriken no kamae, step 5 . The arm moves in a round movement, travelling past the side to the rear, then raises to the position behind the ear yokomen uchi movement in Aikido . The final level called Koso no I, is really the essence of the front throw...

Introduction to shuriken and a short History of the

Negishin Shuriken

There are two basic types of shuriken, bo shuriken, or long thin blades, and hira shuriken also called shaken , or flat, star-shaped or lozenge-shaped blades. The basic method of throwing of the shuriken varies little between schools, the main differences being the shape of the blades and their use. The earliest mention of throwing blades comes from Ganritsu Ryu, founded by Matsubayashi Henyasai, a professional swordsman in service of the 18th lord of Matsuhiro in Kanei, around 1624. This...

Basic Techniques

In the Negishi and Shirai Ryu, there are 2 basic types of throw to the front, and to the side. Front throws involve 3 forms,1. Koso no I, 2. Jikishin and 3. Uranami. The method of learning the front throw, indeed all throws, is by first going through a series of steps from basic form to advanced form. The basic form is called Manji no kata, and is practiced for the first 6 months without holding a blade. It is a simple set of 8 movements, which form the essence of the constant throw, and cannot...

Negishi Shuriken

Throwing Star Collections

Some disc or star-shaped shuriken from various Ninjutsu schools. From top left, examples 1,3, and 4 are shuriken of the Koga and Iga Ryu. 5 and 6 are from Kobori Ryu, 7 is from Yagyu Ryu, 8 from Koden Ryu or Shosho Ryu, 10 is from Yagyu Ryu and Koga Ryu. Figure 16. Some throwing stars from various schools and sources. Figure 16. Some throwing stars from various schools and sources. Figure 17. A Variety of hira shuriken, or shaken throwing blades from the collection of Dr. Masaaki...