Clive Potter

One of the aspects that has made Ving Tsun famous, is its short range centreline punch. To produce power at such a range, accuracy of technique is essential combined with the forward body movement used with the punch. The punch has to do two jobs, hit the opponent and uproot his stance. The punch does not hit by using just the fist and arm; it uses the whole body.

THE FIST

The hand, though closed into a fist, should not be clenched tightly as this stiffens up the forearm and wrist and hampers speed and flow of motion. Neither should the fist be suddenly clenched tightly on impact, as this causes a split second delay after impact to allow the fist to relax before moving on. This makes punching jerky, reduces flow of motion and strangles forward power. It is however, important

Fig. 1

that the striking knuckles, the two lower knuckles, are in line with and therefore supported by the elbow when hitting as in Fig. 1. The fist always travels in a straight line from where it is to its target. This is usually along the centreline and is aimed at the opponent's centreline. (See Fig. 2). It is also important that the attacker is "square on" to the opponents centreline when executing the punch. (See also Fig.2).

When punching, extending the shoulders or over-turning the waist will divert the forward power to a different direction causing the attacker to be more vulnerable to being successfully blocked. For continuous punching it is important that all forces are lined up with the opponent's centreline. In Fig.3, student Mark Potter's back cocked fist is pointing in the wrong direction therefore when it is used to punch its wrong cocked angle will cause a slight downward motion on contact with

Fig. 3

the opponent, thus diverting some of the forward force in a different direction. Fig. 4 shows the correct angle of the back cocked fist. The direction of force is pointing towards the opponents centreline, therefore on contact all force will be directed forward. The fist itself when in the cocked position, should be lined up with the two lower knuckles pointing at the defendant's centreline. (See Fig. 5) On contact however, the fist gives an upward twist directing the forward force at a slight upward angle. This gives a small uprooting effect to the opponent's stance and also gives the punch more penetration. (See Fig. 6). There are more details of techniques for uprooting the opponent's stance later in this article.

THE ELBOW

In Ving Tsun one of the basic rules in all actions is the awareness of the elbow and its specific distance from the body which connects it and the arm to the body. The punch is no exception to this. When punching, awareness is not in the fist but in the elbow; the elbow drives the fist forward. Correct POSITIONING and MOVEMENT of the elbow is essential as part of the techniques to develop power and support the fist. In Figs. 7, 8, and 9, student Rusper Patel shows the path of the elbow. In Fig's. 7 and 8 the path of the elbow is wrong. In Fig 7 the elbow's motion causes the direction of force to lift too greatly loosing the elbow's distance connection with the body and making it too easy to over-extend the arm. In Fig. 8 the elbow's direction will cause a downward arc as the fist

Wing Chun Techniques Elbow Drill

makes contact. This therefore directs some of the forward force away from the target. In Fig. 9 the elbow's movement is correct, being directed forward at solar plexus level as long as possible until it has to rise to join the line of the arm. This action will provide the maximum forward force angled slightly upwards forcing the opponent off balance and therefore uprooting his stance. This will only be effective if the correct distance is kept when contact is made with the target.

makes contact. This therefore directs some of the forward force away from the target. In Fig. 9 the elbow's movement is correct, being directed forward at solar plexus level as long as possible until it has to rise to join the line of the arm. This action will provide the maximum forward force angled slightly upwards forcing the opponent off balance and therefore uprooting his stance. This will only be effective if the correct distance is kept when contact is made with the target.

CONTACT DISTANCE

Contact distance must be correct to be able to deliver he punch with an uprooting effect. In Figs 10 and 11 student Rusper Patel punches student Robin Gillott . In Fig. 10 the contact distance is too far away causing

Fig. 10

Fig. 11

Fig. 10

Fig. 12

Fig. 13

Fig. 11

punch contact to be at the end of the arm's reach. In Fig. 11 the contact distance is correct. Notice the distance of Rusper's elbow from his body on contact which should be the distance of the little fingers to thumb of his outstretched hand. In this way the punch directs the force through the opponent at a slight upward angle forcing him off balance and uprooting his stance. Fig. 12 shows how all these techniques are combined with the forward movement of the stance, thus adding further power. Effectively the punch is aimed right through to the back of the opponent's head. Fig. 13 shows two different aspects. Of course with every force there must be an equal and opposite force. The arrows show that providing a forward force in a slightly upward direction, the equal and opposite force is towards the ground thus student Mark Potter a stable anchorage when his fist hits the target. Note that the angle of the forearm on impact is nearly the same as the angle of the back leg. The dotted line shows the whole line of force supporting the punch which runs from the fist to the ground provided the elbow is of the correct distance from the body to "connect" this line.

An experiment can be conducted to show how uprooting force can work. In

Fig 14, "B" adopts a strong low stance. "A" attempts to push him back off stance. Note that his forward force is parallel to the ground. The arrows show that there is nothing supporting the equal and opposite force. In this way the stronger person will prevail. In Fig. 15, "A" applies his force in a slightly upward direction, and though he is now pushing with one hand instead of two, he will have not too much problem in uprooting and pushing "B" back off his stance. Note that the equal and opposite force for "A" is supported by the ground, but for "B" there is nothing behind him

Fig. 14

CONTINUOUS PUNCHING

Ving Tsun's basic attacking technique is its continuous punching. In this technique each punch should target precisely the same point. This accuracy is practised near the end of the Siu Lin Tau form when three or more punches are executed. Each punch is focused on the same point as the previous one. Multiple punching onto the same point together with moving forward in stance, serves two purposes which are most apparent when attacking someone bigger and tougher then oneself. If the opponent can take he first punch without too much damage, then the second hitting the same point will do a little more damage. The third, fourth, and so on hitting the same point will eventually disable the opponent. Hitting repeatedly on the same point combined with forward movement of the stance to upset the opponent's stance, prevents him from being able to retaliate, as he will be occupied in retreating to try and keep his balance. In a "real" situation, once the first punch gets through, the continuous punching and moving forward, if not blocked, should continue until the opponent fails down or is disabled. In this way, the Ving Tsun punch becomes a formidable weapon, the returning fist drawing down and opening up the defence of the opponent.

Self Defense For Women

Self Defense For Women

Stay Safe & Kick Butt Using Real-Life Self Defense Methods! No matter where you go or end up, you never know where there might be some element of danger lurking which is why it's crucial to know how to protect yourself in dangerous situations!

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment