Never Remove The Trigger Mechanism Or Make Adjustments To The Trigger Assembly Except For The Trigger Pull Force Adjustment

c. Trigger Assembly. Pulling the trigger fires the rifle when the safety is in the F" position. The operator may adjust the trigger pull force from a minimum of 2 pounds to a maximum of 8 pounds. This is done using the l/16-inch socket head screw key provided in the deployment kit. Turning the trigger adjustment screw (Figure 2-6) clockwise increases the force needed to pull the trigger. Turning it counterclockwise decreases the force needed. This is the only trigger adjustment the sniper should make.

FLOORPLATE LATCH

Figure 2-6. Trigger adjustment.

FLOORPLATE LATCH

Figure 2-6. Trigger adjustment.

d. Stock Adjustment. The M24's stock has an adjustable butt plate to accommodate the length of pull. The stock adjustment (Figure 2-7) consists of a thin wheel and a thick wheel. The thick wheel adjusts the shoulder stock. The thin wheel locks the shoulder stock.

(1) Turn the thick wheel clockwise to lengthen the stock.

(2) Turn the thick wheel counterclockwise to shorten the stock.

(3) To lock the shoulder stock into position, turn the thin wheel clockwise against the thick wheel.

(4) To unlock the shoulder stock, turn the thin wheel counterclockwise away from the thick wheel.

e. Sling Adjustment The sling helps hold the weapon steady without muscular effort. The more the muscles are used the harder it is to hold the weapon steady. The sling tends to bind the parts of the body used in aiming into a rigid bone brace, requiring less effort than would be necessary if no sling were used. When properly adjusted, the sling permits part of the recoil of the rifle to reabsorbed by the nonfiring arm and hand, removing recoil from the firing shoulder.

(1) The sling consists of two different lengths of leather straps joined together by a metal D ring (Figure 2-8). The longer strap is connected to the sling swivel on the rear stud on the forearm of the rifle. The shorter strap is attached to the sling swivel on the buttstock of the rifle. There are two leather loops on the long strap known as keepers. The keepers are used to adjust the tension on the sling. The frogs are hooks that are used to adjust the length of the sling.

(2) To adjust the sling, the sniper disconnects the sling from the buttstock swivel. Then, he adjusts the length of the metal D ring that joins the two halves of the sling. He then makes sure it is even with the comb of the stock when attaching the sling to the front swivel (Figure 2-9).

the two halves of the sling. He then makes sure it is even with the comb of the stock when attaching the sling to the front swivel (Figure 2-9).

Figure 2-9. Sling adjustment.

(3) The sniper adjusts the length of the sling by placing the frog on the long strap of the sling in the 4th to the 7th set of adjustment holes on the rounded end of the long strap that goes through the sling swivel on the forearm (Figure 2-10).

(4) After adjusting the length, the sniper places the weapon on his firing

2-10. Adjusting the length of the sling. hip and supports the

Figure 2-9. Sling adjustment.

weapon with his firing arm. The sniper turns the sling away from him 90 degrees and inserts nis nonfiring arm.

(5) The sniper slides the loop in the large section of the sling up the nonfiring arm until it is just below the armpit (Figure 2-11). He then slides both leather keepers down the sling until they bind the loop snugly round the nonfiring arm.

(6) The sniper moves his nonfiring hand from the outside of the sling to the inside of the sling between the rifle and the sling. The sniper then grasps the forearm of the weapon, just behind the sling swivel with his nonfiring hand. He forces it outward and away from his body with the nonfiring hand (Figure 2-12).

(7) The sniper pulls the butt of the weapon into the pocket of his shoulder with the firing hand. He then grasps the weapon at the small of the stock and begins the aiming process.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment